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  1. Penn Foster Graded Project 03784300 GroceryApp Basket Details

    Penn Foster Graded Project 03784300 Windows Forms and Applications

    Regular Price: $20.00

    Special Price: $15.00

    Penn Foster Graded Project 03784300 Windows Forms and Applications


    OVERVIEW
    This project will assess your understanding of accessing files, using data-bound controls, and deploying your application.
    Make sure that you follow all directions completely and verify your results before submitting the project. Remember to include all required components in your solution.


    YOUR PROJECT
    In the graded project for Lesson 4, you added the GroceryItemForm to the GroceryApp project. In this project, you’ll
    - Add functionality to save and load saved grocery basket files
    - Display the contents of the basket using the data-bound control DataGridView
    - Add a form to the project to display grocery items in the basket
    - Locate and share your application assembly with your instructor
    Note: This project is the last graded project based on this scenario. You’ll be graded on the end-user functionality, so variable names and other code conventions are your choice, but the application must behave as expected.


    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. In Visual Studio, load the GroceryApp project that you completed in Lesson 4.
    2. Open the GroceryItemForm.vb file.
    3. Add the options &Save and &L oad to the Application menu above the Exit option. You can add the Save and Exit options to the Application menu underneath Exit and then click and drag them above it.
    4. Add the OpenFileDialog and SaveFileDialog components to the Windows form.
    5. In the Click event for the Save option, prompt the user for a file location and store the basket as a text file. Recall that grocery items are stored in the basket variable.
    Hint: You could use a CSV file similar to a flat-file database, like the example in Section 2 of Lesson 5.
    6. In the Click event for the Load option, prompt the user for a file location and load the contents of the text file into the basket. Make sure you empty the basket first.
    Hint: You could use the Split method in the String class to break each line into individual array items. See the MSDN Library at http://tinyurl.com/3odx56 for more details.
    7. Save your work and test the application.
    a. Add some items to the basket and save them.
    b. Then attempt to load them again.
    c. Click on the View option in the Basket menu to see the basket contents. You will modify how this menu option works in the concluding steps.
    8. Add a new form to the project named BasketDisplayForm.
    a. Set the Text property to Basket Contents.
    b. Set the Size property to 600, 300.
    9. Add a DataGridView control named viewBasket.
    10. Set the Dock property of the DataGridView control to Fill.
    11. In the Load event of the BasketDisplayForm, add the following code to display the basket contents in the DataGridView control:
    viewBasket.DataSource = basket
    Notice how simple it is to perform data-binding with collections.
    12. Go back to the code view of GroceryItemForm.
    13. Replace the content of the ViewToolStripMenuItem_Click event handler, so that it loads and displays the BasketDisplayForm modally.
    Hint: You don’t have to worry about the basket variable, because the BasketDisplayForm handles data-binding in its Load event.
    14. Save and run the application. Verify that all controls and menus work correctly. You’ll submit the compiled application for this project.


    SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
    You’ll submit the GroceryApp.exe file for your project. To find this file, you should go to directory where you saved the GroceryApp project. To open the project directory, right-click on GroceryApp in the Solution Explorer panel and choose the Open Folder in File Explorer option in the context menu.
    Go to the bin\Debug folder and copy the GroceryApp.exe file to your desktop or any other temporary location. You should make sure the GroceryApp.exe file executes before submission. You can double-click on it without using Visual Studio for testing.


    GRADING CRITERIA
    Your project will be graded using the following rubric:
    The Save menu option performs the correct behavior 30 points
    The Load menu option performs the correct behavior 30 points
    The View menu option performs the correct behavior 15 points
    The BasketDisplayForm is laid out correctly 15 points
    The compiled application is included and runs 10 points
    TOTAL 100 points

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  2. CIS 115 Week 7 Lab Sales Tax

    CIS 115 Week 7 Lab - Sales Tax

    Regular Price: $15.00

    Special Price: $12.00

    CIS 115 Week 7 Lab - Sales Tax


    Scenario
    Your algorithm will write two functions called ComputeTotal() and ComputeTax().
    ComputeTotal() will receive the quantity of items purchased, and the unit price of each item. It will return the total sales (quantity times price).
    ComputeTax() will receive total sales as a number and the state as a string and return the amount of tax depending on the state. NJ requires 7% tax, FL requires 6% tax, and NY has 4% tax.
    The main program will ask for the name of the customer as well as one of the three states listed above. It will ask for the number of items sold and the unit price of the item.
    Main will then call ComputeTotal(), passing the quantity and unit price. Main will then call ComputeTax(), passing the state and the amount of sales and receive back the tax. Finally Main() will print out the total sales, the tax amount, and the total with taxes. For example, see below.
    Input Example:
    Enter the name of the customer: Jack
    In which state (NY / NJ / FL): NJ
    How many items were purchased: 3
    What was the unit price of the items: 1.50


    Corresponding Output Example:
    The total sales for Jack are $4.50
    The tax amount is $0.32 based on a tax rate for NJ
    The total with taxes is $4.82


    Make sure you save the return values into an appropriate variable.


    Be sure to think about the logic and design first (IPO chart, pseudocode, and flowchart), then code the Visual Basic program.
    See list of required steps and grading rubric on next page…


    Rubric
    Point distribution for this activity:
    Sales Tax
    Document Points possible Points received
    Variable list 5
    IPO chart 10
    Hierarchy chart & Flowchart 15
    Pseudocode 10
    Working program 20
    Total Points 60


    1) Variable List
    List all of the variables you will use and make sure those variable names are valid. Indicate whether the data type is string, integer, decimal, etc.


    2) IPO Chart
    List the inputs, processes/calculations, and the outputs. Use the same valid variable names you used in Step 1.


    3) Hierarchy chart & Flowchart
    Use MS Visio to create a hierarchy chart and a flowchart. Paste the charts here. Use the same valid variable names you used in Step 1.


    4) Pseudocode
    Describe your solution using pseudocode. Use the same valid variable names you selected in Step 1.


    5) Visual Basic Code
    Screen Shot of Running Program


    Copy/paste your Visual Basic code here.
    Paste a screenshot of the complete working program here.

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  3. Advanced Visual Basic 2010 Programming Challenge 3 Winter Sports Rentals

    Advanced Visual Basic 2010 Programming Challenge 3 Winter Sports Rentals

    Regular Price: $20.00

    Special Price: $15.00

    Advanced Visual Basic 2010 Programming Challenge 3 Winter Sports Rentals


    A winter sports rentals store needs an application that will let the user (a store clerk) enter information about each customer’s rental. The user should be able to select multiple equipment items, a rental duration, and insurance. Figure 2-46 shows a sample design, after the user has selected all items and clicked the Calculate button. Include a check box showing that a liability waiver was signed, and let the user input the deposit amount. Use a combo box to list the rental durations, but do not let the user type in an arbitrary duration. When the user clicks the Calculate button, the application should calculate the subtotal, tax, and balance due. Also, use a LinkLabel control (Weather forecast) to display a second form containing a WebBrowser control.


    The form containing the WebBrowser control, shown in Figure 2-47, should display a series of links to weather forecasts for the area near the winter sports rental store. Place a ToolStrip container at the top of the form; it should contain a text box (for entering a Web address), a Go button to navigate to the address typed into the text box, and a Close button that closes the browser window. Note: We do not endorse any particular Web search engine, so you may substitute another of your choosing.


    Error Checking: When the user clicks the Calculate button, make sure that at least one item has been selected from the equipment list box. Also, a rental duration must have been selected, and the Deposit amount must be a positive number. Use the ErrorProvider control to display all error messages. The following rental durations should appear in the combo box: 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks.


    Calculations: Each equipment item has a rental rate based on different durations. Create a two-dimensional array containing all possible rental rates. Each row should contain the rental rates for a single item, using the different rental durations. The following first row of the array, for example, contains rental rates for Skis, beginner:
    35,45,80,150,280
    For this equipment, the rates are $35.00 for 1 day, $45.00 for 2 days, $80.00 for 3 days, $150.00 for a week, and $280.00 for 2 weeks. Damage insurance costs 10 percent of the total rental charge before taxes.

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  4. POS 409 Week 3 Sorting and Searching C# Program

    POS 409 Week 3 Sorting and Searching C# Program

    Regular Price: $20.00

    Special Price: $15.00

    POS 409 Week 3 Sorting and Searching C# Program


    Create a text file with one record of text data. This text file will be read by the program and the data in the text file will serve as a search term.


    Design, implement, test, and debug a C# program using the following guidelines.


    In the form load event, read the text file you built. This row of data will be a word or phrase that may occur in the data entered on the form (referred to later as "search term"). Convert the text read to uppercase.


    Create a form with textboxes for 10 input fields. Designate the fields in such a way that the user enters specific data (for example, movies, books, names, or sports). The data entered should be of type string.


    Add a button, "Accept Input", to accept the input. In the click event for the button, validate the input and load the input into an array.
    Validate the input by calling a value-returning method. Pass the 10 input fields to the method and return a value to indicate whether or not the data passed validation (for example, you can return a zero if the data passed validation and a 1 if it did not). Validation should consist of checking if data was entered in the field. Notify the user if the data is not valid and stop execution.
    Add a void method that loads the input fields into an array and converts the data in them to uppercase.


    Add another button, "Sort Input", to sort the input data. In the click event for the button, add a void method to do the sorting. In the void method, use the selection sort algorithm presented in chapter 7 to sort the data. After sorting, in the button click event, create a loop to iterate through the array of sorted data and display the data in a listbox on the form.


    Add a final button to the form, "Check Input". In the click event for the button, call a value-returning method. This method will compare the data in the array and the search term (data read in the form load event). Count the number of elements in the array in which the search term is found. Pass the number of times the word or phrase is found back as the value returned. Put the results in a label on the form. For example, if my search term is "the", the label might say "Search term - the - is found 3 times in the input data". The search should count as a match if the search term is only a portion of the array element. For example, if your search term is "the" and the array element is "The Old Man and The Sea", it should count as a match because "the" is contained within the array element. However, you do not need to count all occurrences of the search term in the array element. So, in "The Old Man and The Sea" example, count once, not twice.


    Here is an example. My search term is "the". The array elements are: "The Old Man and The Sea", "Jane Eyre", "Moby Dick", "The Great Gatsby", "MacBeth", "The Iliad and the Odyssey", "Huckleberry Finn", "Catch-22", "To Kill a Mockingbird", and "The Bell Jar". With this data, the program should find 4 occurrences of the search term (those array elements that are underlined).


    The type of application to be developed is a Windows Forms application.


    Please note that the reason the selection sort algorithm is required for this assignment is two-fold. First, it will give you a chance to look at someone else's code and learn it well enough to figure out how to modify it. Second, it will give you additional practice with string handling when you learn how to compare strings. It is not acceptable to try to find another way to sort the data.


    Include identifying information in the form of block comments at the top of each class in the project (programmer name, date, program description). Include adequate comments throughout the program, utilize meaningful names for controls, variables, fields, and forms. Include white space for readability purposes in the code. The focus of the project is on learning the C#.Net syntax. However, ensure the form is simple and easy to understand for the user. Refer to the Individual Assignment grading form to view grading criteria.


    Zip the files of the project together and submit the zipped file. Include the text file used in your zip file also.

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  5. Penn Foster Final Graded Project 03784400 Hangman Game

    Penn Foster Final Graded Project 03784400 Hangman Game

    Regular Price: $25.00

    Special Price: $20.00

    Penn Foster Final Graded Project 03784400 Hangman Game


    OVERVIEW
    Now that you've completed the lessons and required textbook reading, you're ready to put it all together for the final project. This project is a final assessment on the entire course and covers all the lessons. This is a new Windows application that's not based on the output of any previous graded projects. You may find it helpful to review the instructions of previous graded projects and the completed output from Lesson 5 graded project.
    Make sure that you follow all directions completely and verify your results before submitting the project. Remember to include all required components in your solution.


    YOUR PROJECT
    You've been tasked to create an educational game for a fifth grade reading class. The game must test student's spelling skills using a variation of the classic game Hangman. If you're unfamiliar with the rules and general game play, please consult the online reference at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangman_(game) for more information.


    Database
    The application will use the HangManDB.mdf file. The HangManDB database contains the tables in Figure 58. The UnitID column in the Words table is a foreign key to the ID column in the Units table. The Word column contains the actual word to guess, while the Description column contains the description of words for that unit.


    User Interface
    The user interface will consist of a single Windows form. The user interface will resemble Figure 59.
    When the application first loads, the textbox for the letter guess should be disabled (Figure 60). If the New option is chosen in the menu, then a new word and the unit description should be loaded from the database. If the Quit option is chosen in the menu, then the application should quit.


    After each guess, one of two things should happen. If it's a correct guess, then all occurrences of that letter should appear in the labels at the bottom. If it's an incorrect guess, then the next stage of the hangman should appear in the picture box. In either case, the textbox should highlight the letter, so that the user can make another guess. The textbox should not be cleared or the user may attempt to guess the same letter (Figure 61).


    The game ends when either all letters of the word are guessed correctly or the hangman picture is completed. When the game is won (Figure 62) or lost (Figure 63), a message box should display, prompting to play again.


    In either case, clicking the Yes button should have the same effect as clicking the New option in the menu, and clicking the No button should exit out of the application.


    Application Files
    This application will consist of the following files in the solution explorer:
    1. GameForm.vb. The only form in the application.
    2. HangmanDB.mdf. The database that contains the questions and unit descriptions.
    3. Images folder. The images needed for the different visual states of the hangman.
    4. QuestionDataSet.xsd. The DataSet for the HangmanDB database. Should contain both tables Words and Units.
    HangmanDB.MDF and the Images folder will be provided to you.


    Provided Files
    You'll be provided with the following files:
    - The HangmanDB.mdf database
    - The Images folder that contains the image files
    Hangman-0.png, Hangman-1.png, Hangman-2.png, Hangman-3.png, Hangman-4.png, Hangman-5.png, and Hangman-6.png
    - The HelperMethodsCode.txt file with suggested code


    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. In Visual Studio, create a new Windows Forms Application project named HangmanApp.
    2. Create the Images folder in the project by using the Add > New Folder option in the Solution Explorer or the New Folder option in the Project menu
    3. Add each hangman image to the Image folder. You can either click and drag them into the Solution Explorer or use the Add > Existing Item... option and select all images using the Shift key. If using the second method, make sure to change filter to All Files (*.*).
    4. In the Properties panel, set the Copy To Output Directory property to Copy Always for each image file. You can use the Shift key to select all image files at once.
    5. Add the HangmanDB.mdf database to the project. Use the Add > Existing Item... option. Make sure to change filter to All Files (*.*).
    6. In the Data Source Configuration Wizard dialog, choose the DataSet option and then click the Next button.
    7. Check the checkbox next to Tables and then click the Finish button. This will create a default dataset named HangmanDBDataSet with the Units and Words data tables.
    8. Rename the Form1.vb file to GameForm.vb.
    9. Click the Yes button in the dialog to rename the Form1 class as well.


    10. Create the user interface for GameForm.vb. See the User Interface section above for the layout. The form will consist of the following controls:
    a. One MenuStrip control that contains the Game menu with the options New and Quit.
    b. One Label control for instruction with the text Guess a letter; 14-point font recommended.
    c. One Label control for the unit description.
    d. One TextBox control for the user to type in letter choices.
    e. A PictureBox control that will display the hangman images. You'll set the ImageLocation property to load the hangman images.
    f. A Panel control that will contain the displayed letter labels.
    g. Eleven Label controls, one for each letter of the word. These labels should be in the panel and will have an initial placeholder until the user guesses a letter.
    You can choose to set the control properties to whatever you like, but below are some helpful suggestions. If you don’t name the controls with the recommended names, you will need to modify some provided code shown in Table 4.


    6. In the body of GameForm, you should define the following variables:
    a. dsQuestions. A HangmanDBDataSet object
    b. numWord. The index of which word is being guessed.
    c. strWord. The actual word being guessed.
    d. numRightGuesses. Number of right guesses in a game.
    e. numWrongGuesses. Number of wrong guesses in a game.
    f. blnGameStarted. Indicates whether the game has started or not.


    7. In the body of GameForm, you should define the following utility methods:
    a. A method named CheckProgress that calculates the total number of tries (numRightGuesses + numWrongGuesses), displays the correct message box for winning or losing, and starts the next game or exits the application depending on the message box button
    b. A method named WonGame that checks each letter in the word is matched by its label and returns True if this is the case
    c. A method named LostGame that checks to see if the number of wrong guesses is greater than six and returns True if this is the case
    d. A method named ResetAllLabels that sets each character label to blank text


    8. Open the HelperMethodsCode.txt file and copy and paste its contents into the GameForm class.
    Note: These handy methods will reduce your development time. Think of it as help from a colleague, because you’ll rarely develop a business application alone and most often will work within a team.


    9. In the body of GameForm, you should have the following event procedures:
    a. Form Load event handler. Disable the txtGuess textbox, initialize numWord to -1 to indicate no word has been chosen, and call the LoadData method.
    b. Quit button Click event handler. Exit the application
    c. In the New button Click event handler, perform the following tasks:
    I. Initialize all variables, especially numRightGuesses, numWrongGuesses, blnGameStarted, and numWord. Make sure to increment numWord to the next index. Each game will increment this number by one.
    II. Initialize controls. Clear the text of all controls, including the labels, textbox, and picture box. For the picture box, you can just set its ImageLocation to “”.
    III. Enable and set the focus of the txtGuess textbox.
    IV. Set controls using the DataSet. If you followed the same names, then you can use this code:
    ‘Get a word column row
    strWord = CStr(dsQuestions.Words(numWord)(1))
    ‘Gets unitdescription
    lblUnitDescription.Text = CStr(dsQuestions.Words(numWord).UnitsRow(1))
    V. Set the Text property to the underscore character (_) for each label control based on the number of characters in the word.
    D. In the txt Guess text box Text Changed event, perform the following tasks:
    I. Check if the game is started using the blnGameStarted variable and that the txtGuess textbox contains a value. Clearing a textbox will trigger a TextChanged event, so you’ll need to
    verify a letter was actually typed by the user.
    II. Check to see if the word (strWord) contains the guess (txtGuess).
    III. If it does, then call the SetRightLetterLabels method and increment the numRightGuesses variable.
    IV. If it doesn't, set the image in the pboxHangman and increment the numWrongGuesses variable.
    Your code should resemble the following:
    pboxHangman.ImageLocation ="images\Hangman-" & numWrongGuesses & ".png"
    numWrongGuesses + = 1
    V. Check to see if the game has been won or lost yet. Use the CheckProgress method.
    VI. Select the text in the txtGuess textbox.


    10. Save and run the application. Verify that all controls and menus work correctly. You’ll submit the compiled application for this project.


    SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
    You’ll submit the HangmanApp.exe file for your project.
    To find this file, you should go to directory to where you saved the HangmanApp project and copy the HangmanApp.exe file from the bin\Debug folder. Make sure the HangmanApp.exe file executes before submission. The Images folder and HangmanDB.mdf must be in the same directory as the HangmanApp.exe to execute as expected.


    Use the following procedure to submit your project online:
    1. Log in to view your student homepage and go to the My Courses page.
    2. Click the Take Exam link next to the lesson you’re working on.
    3. Attach our files as follows:
    a. Click the Browse button.
    b. Locate the file you wish to attach.
    c. Double-click on the file.
    d. Click the Upload File button.
    4. Enter your email address in the box provided.
    (Note: Your email address is required for online submissions.)
    5. If you wish to include comments about this project to your instructor, enter your comments in the Message textbox.
    6. Click Submit Files.

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  6. POS 409 Week 1 C# Program Friends Name GUI

    POS 409 Week 1 C# Program Friends Name GUI

    Regular Price: $12.00

    Special Price: $10.00

    POS 409 Week 1 C# Program Friends Name GUI


    Design, implement, test, and debug a C# program that displays a Friend's name when button is clicked.


    Create a graphical user interface (GUI) with a button labeled "Friend's name".
    When the Friend's Name button is clicked, the program will display the name of the Friend in a label on the form.
    Add a button that will exit the program.
    Your name, date, project description and class name must be in the code as comments (similar to an APA title page).
    Your project must be properly documented (describe the use of variables, describe how a function or routine works, use proper naming conventions for a variables and labels).


    Options:
    Add a button that will change the color of the name label.
    Add a button that will change the location of the name label.
    Cycle through multiple names when the Friend's Name button is selected.


    Zip the files of the project together and submit the zipped file.

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  7. POS 409 Week 2 Card Game War C# Program

    POS 409 Week 2 Card Game War C# Program

    Regular Price: $20.00

    Special Price: $15.00

    POS 409 Week 2 Card Game War C# Program


    Design, implement, test, and debug a C# program to simulate playing the card game War. Utilizing the C# random number generator, deal 26 sets of 2 cards each. This should be accomplished with only one click of a button. The "cards" should be values 1 through 13; 1 is an ace, two is a two, etc.; and 11 is a jack, 12 is a queen, and 13 is a king. Keep two counters - one for player 1 and one for player 2. As you deal the cards (ie, generate the numbers in a loop), if the first card is larger than the second, add 1 to player 1's counter. If the second card is larger than the first, add 1 to player 2's counter. For the purposes of this program, a 2 will beat an ace. Also, as you deal the cards, write the results to a text file. The results should contain the values of both cards dealt and which player won that deal. For example, the record written to the text file could say "Player 1 dealt 3, player 2 dealt 11, player 2 wins". It is not necessary to translate a 1 into "ace", an 11 into "jack", a 12 into "queen", or a 13 into "king". After 26 deals of cards, the results will be read from the text file and displayed on the form. Remember to utilize concepts learned in this week's reading (especially chapters 4 and 5 of Starting Out with Visual C#). The type of application to be developed is a Windows Forms application. Please note that graphics are not needed. This program is only a simulation; it is not intended to actually look like the user is dealing cards. Also please note that no complicated algorithms or logic is needed. You do not need to do any logic to ensure that 52 unique cards are dealt or anything related to the suit of the card. The assignment is simply to see how you do with the key concepts for this week.


    When the user clicks a Deal Cards button, the program will write the values of the cards "dealt" to each of the players as noted above. If I open the text file written, I should see 26 records, with three things on each record (the value of each card and the winner of the deal). If the deal is a tie, note it in the results.
    Notify the user in some way that the game is done and the file is written.


    After the file is written, the user may click a Display Game Results button to read the items back in and display the results in a textbox or listbox. When I look at the form after I click the Display Game Results button, I should see 26 entries on the form. Also create 2 labels on the form. In the first label, display the number of deals won by player 1 (such as "Player 1 won 10 deals"). In the second label, display the number of deals won by player 2.


    Include identifying information in the form of block comments at the top of each class in the project (programmer name, date, program description). Include adequate comments throughout the program, utilize meaningful names for controls, variables, fields, and forms. Include white space for readability purposes in the code. The focus of the project is on learning the C#.Net syntax. However, ensure the form is simple and easy to understand for the user. Refer to the Individual Assignment grading form to view grading criteria.
    Design a GUI for the program that will be intuitive for a novice user.


    Write the code for the program and test the results.


    Zip the files of the project together and submit the zipped file

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  8. Program 1 Review Exercise

    Program 1 Review Exercise

    Regular Price: $20.00

    Special Price: $15.00

    Program 1 is a simple review exercise.


    Construct an application that contains at least 15 DIFFERENT controls of your choosing.


    The controls must function properly.


    That is, it is not simply a matter of including the controls, they must each have at least minimum functionality.


    As part of the same application, but on a separate form, list the controls and their functionality.

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  9. POS 409 Week 1 Dogs name GUI

    POS 409 Week 1 Dogs name GUI C# Program

    Regular Price: $15.00

    Special Price: $12.00

    POS 409 Week 1 Dogs name GUI C# Program


    Design, implement, test, and debug a C# program that displays a dog's name and age when a button is clicked. The type of application to be developed is a Windows Forms application.


    Create a graphical user interface (GUI) with a button labeled "Continue", a textbox labeled "Name", and a textbox labeled "Age".


    When the Continue button is clicked, the program will capture the name from the Name textbox, the age from the Age textbox, calculate the age in dog years (multiply the age by 7), and display the name and age of the pet in one label on the form (for example, "Rocky is 35 years old").


    Include identifying information in the form of block comments at the top of each class in the project (programmer name, date, program description). Include adequate comments throughout the program, utilize meaningful names for controls, variables, fields, and forms. Include white space for readability purposes in the code. The focus of the project is on learning the C#.Net syntax. However, ensure the form is simple and easy to understand for the user. Refer to the Individual Assignment grading form to view grading criteria.


    Zip the files of the project together and submit the zipped file.

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  10. CIS 115 Week 7 Exercise Modularized Code word Document

    CIS 115 Week 7 Exercise - Modularized Code

    Regular Price: $12.00

    Special Price: $10.00

    CIS 115 Week 7 Exercise - Modularized Code


    Assignment
    It’s often necessary to convert between units. In this exercise, you will create two functions for converting between units of distance. The first function will be called ConvertMilesToKilometers(), which will accept one parameter for the number of miles. It will return the equivalent number of kilometers. The second function will be called ConvertKilometersToMiles() and will accept kilometers as its parameter; this will return the equivalent number of miles.
    The main program will ask the user if he or she wants to convert miles to kilometers or kilometers to miles. It will then ask for the number of miles or kilometers. It will call the appropriate function and display the converted value. Be sure to call the correct function. Be sure to save the return value in an appropriate variable. To convert miles to kilometers, divide miles by 0.62137. To convert kilometers to miles, multiply kilometers by 0.62137.


    Examples
    Do you want to convert to Miles or Kilometers? (M or K): M
    Enter number of Kilometers: 3.5
    3.5 kilometers equals 2.174795 miles.


    Do you want to convert to Miles or Kilometers? (M or K): K
    Enter number of Miles: 4.2
    4.2 miles equals 6.759258 kilometers.


    Be sure to think about the logic and design first (IPO chart, flowchart, and pseudocode), then code the Visual Basic program.
    See list of required steps and grading rubric on next page…


    Rubric
    Complete the steps, record your results in this document and submit the completed file to
    the appropriate Dropbox.
    1) Variable list
    2) IPO chart
    3) Hierarchy Chart & Flowchart
    4) Pseudocode
    5) Visual Basic code


    Modularized Code
    Document Points possible Points received
    Variable list 4
    IPO chart 4
    Hierarchy Chart & Flowchart 4
    Pseudocode 4
    Working Program 4
    Total Points 20


    1) Variable List
    List all of the variables you will use and make sure those variable names are valid. Indicate whether the data type is string, integer, decimal, etc.


    2) IPO Chart
    List the inputs, processes/calculations, and outputs. Use the same valid variable names you used in Step 1.
    Inputs Process (calculations) Outputs


    3) Hierarchy Chart & Flowchart
    Use MS Visio to create a hierarchy chart and flowchart. Paste the hierarchy chart and flowchart here. Use the same valid variable names you used in Step 1.


    4) Pseudocode
    Describe your solution using pseudocode. Use the same valid variable names you selected in Step 1.


    5) Visual Basic Code
    Screen Shot of Running Program
    Copy/paste your Visual Basic code here.
    Paste a screenshot(s) of the complete working program here.

    Learn More

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