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  1. Penn foster Graded Project Number Guessing Game JavA

    Penn foster Graded Project 1 Number Guessing Game Java

    Regular Price: $20.00

    Special Price: $15.00

    Penn foster Graded Project Number Guessing Game Java

    For your first project, you'll create a simple number guessing game. The game will use a for statement to ask for three guesses and an if statement to determine if the answer is right.

    1. In NetBeans, create a new Java Application project named NumberGuess. Review Activity 2 for details.

    2. In the main() method, add the following code to generate a random number. Note that the fourth and fifth lines of code should all go on one single line.
    int randNum, guessNum, attemptNum;
    //Generates a random number from 1 to 10
    randNum = new java.util.Random().nextInt(10) + 1;
    System.out.println("I am thinking of a number from 1 to 10");

    3. Using a for loop, ask for three guesses, using the attemptNum variable. See pages 23–24 in the textbook for more details. You can use the following code to ask for a guess:
    System.out.print("Guess? ");
    //Wraps the default input in a simple parser
    called Scanner
    java.util.Scanner scan = new
    java.util.Scanner(System.in);
    guessNum = scan.nextInt(); //Reads the next command-line int
    System.out.println("You guessed " + guessNum);

    4. Using an if statement in the for block, determine whether randNum and guessNum are equal. See pages 21–23 for in the textbook for more details. You can use the following code if randNum and guessNum are equal:
    System.out.println("You guessed it!");
    break;

    5. When you're finished, the contents of the main() method should resemble the following:
    int randNum, guessNum, attemptNum
    //Generates a random number from 1 to 10
    randNum = new java.util.Random().nextInt(10) + 1;
    System.out.println("I am thinking of random number from 1 to 10");
    for (/* Figure this part out yourself */) {
    System.out.print("Guess? ");
    java.util.Scanner scan = new
    java.util.Scanner(System.in);
    guessNum = scan.nextInt();
    System.out.println("You guessed " + guessNum);
    if (/* Figure this part out yourself */) {
    System.out.println("You guessed it!");
    break;
    }
    }

    6. Compile and run the project to ensure it works as expected. To type input, make sure you click in the Output panel; otherwise, you’ll modify code.

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  2. Penn foster Graded Project 3 Cell-based Board Games Java

    Penn foster Graded Project 3 Cell-based Board Games Java

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    Penn foster Graded Project 3 Cell-based Board Games Java

    In this project, you'll create data types in a class structure for cell-based board games similar to Tic-Tac-Toe. Games like Connect Four and Mastermind also use boards divided by rows and columns. The Board and Cell classes represent the board, while the Player, Mark, and Outcome enumerations track the game.
    You’ll use the classes and enumerations created in this project in future graded projects. You use the NetBeans project in the next lesson

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. In NetBeans, create a new Java Application project named BoardGameTester.
    2. Create a new package named games and a sub-package of games named board. The easiest way is simply to create a package named games.board.
    3. Add an enumeration named Player to the games.board package. You could add Empty Java File or choose Java Enum as the file type. This enumeration represents the current player in a turn-based game. Use the following code:
    public enum Player {FIRST,SECOND}
    Note: Although Tic-Tac-Toe and Mastermind allow only two players, Connect Four can be played with up to four players. For simplicity, our code will handle only two players.
    4. Add an enumeration named Outcome to the games.board package. This enumeration represents the result when the turn is completed. Use the following code:
    public enum Outcome {PLAYER1_WIN, PLAYER2_WIN, CONTINUE, TIE}
    5. Add an enumeration named Mark to the games.board package. This enumeration represents the result when the game is completed. Use the following code:
    public enum Mark {EMPTY, NOUGHT, CROSS, YELLOW, RED, BLUE, GREEN, MAGENTA, ORANGE}
    Keep in mind that only yellow and red are used in Connect Four, while Mastermind uses all six colors.
    6. Add the Cell class to the games.board package. It should have the private variables content, row, and column, and the public methods getContent, setContent, getRow, and getColumn. Use the following code as a guide:
    public class Cell {
    private Mark content;
    private int row, column;
    public Cell(int row, int column) {
    this.row = row;
    this.column = column;
    content = Mark.EMPTY;
    }
    public Mark getContent() { return content; }
    public void setContent(Mark content) { this.content = content;
    }
    public int getRow() { return row; }
    public int getColumn() { return column; }
    }
    Take note that all classes that support direct instantiation should have a constructor. In this case, the constructor will be used by the Board class to create each of its cells.
    7. Add the Board class to the games.board package. It should have a two-dimensional array of Cell objects. The Board class should initialize a board with a specified number of columns and rows, provide access to Cell objects, and display all of its cells correctly. Use the following code as a guide:
    public class Board {
    private Cell[][] cells;
    public Board(int rows, int columns) {
    cells = new Cell[rows][columns];
    for( int r = 0; r < cells[0].length; r++) {
    for (int c = 0; c < cells[1].length;c++) {
    cells[r][c] = new Cell(r,c);
    }
    }
    }
    public void setCell(Mark mark, int row, int
    column) throws IllegalArgumentException {
    if (cells[row][column].getContent() == Mark.EMPTY)
    cells[row][column].setContent(mark);
    else throw new IllegalArgumentException("Player already there!");
    }
    public Cell getCell(int row, int column) {
    return cells[row][column];
    }
    public String toString() {
    StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder();
    for( int r = 0; r < cells.length; r++ ) {
    str.append("|");
    for (int c = 0; c < cells[r].length; c++) {
    switch(cells[r][c].getContent())
    {
    case NOUGHT:
    str.append("O");
    break;
    case CROSS:
    str.append("X");
    break;
    case YELLOW:
    str.append("Y");
    break;
    case RED:
    str.append("R");
    break;
    case BLUE:
    str.append("B");
    break;
    case GREEN:
    str.append("G");
    break;
    case MAGENTA:
    str.append("M");
    break;
    case ORANGE:
    str.append("M");
    break;
    default: //Empty
    str.append(" ");
    }
    str.append("|");
    }
    str.append("\n");
    }
    return str.toString();
    }
    }

    This code should seem familiar to you. The methods in the TicTacToeGame class are similar to those in the Board class. The StringBuilder class was used instead of the String class for better performance. You can learn more about the StringBuilder class by visiting the Oracle Website at http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/data/buffers.html.

    8. Add the following import statement to the BoardGameTester class:
    import games.boards.*;

    9. In the main() method of BoardGameTester, perform the following actions:
    a. Create a 3 × 3 board for a Tic-Tac-Toe game.
    b. Create a 6 × 7 board for a Connect Four game.
    c. Create a 5 × 8 board for a game of Mastermind.
    d. Set a cell to a nought or cross on the Tic-Tac-Toe board.
    e. Set a cell to yellow or red on the Connect Four board.
    f. Set a cell to yellow, red, green, blue, magenta, or orange on the Mastermind board.
    g. Display the boards for Tic-Tac-Toe, Connect Four, and Mastermind.

    10. Compile and run the project to ensure it works as you expected it to.

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  3. Penn foster Graded Project 4 BoardGameTester application Java

    Penn foster Graded Project 4 BoardGameTester application Java

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    Penn foster Graded Project 4 BoardGameTester application Java

    In this project, you'll modify the BoardGameTester application to save the gameboard to a file. You'll perform the file writing process on a separate thread.

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. In NetBeans, open the BoardGameTester project.
    2. Create a new package named games.utilities.
    3. Add a public class named FileManager that contains the following methods:
    public static void writeToFile(String saveState, String fileName) {
    //TODO: Write a string to a new file synchronously
    }
    public static void writeToFileAsync(final String saveState, final String fileName) {
    //TODO: Write a string to a new file asynchronously
    }
    4. Implement the writeToFile method using the new file I/O classes in a try-with-resources statement.
    Note: Use the code in Activity 15 as a guide for the writeToFile method. Remember to import the java.io, java.nio, java.nio.charset, and java.nio.file packages.
    5. Implement the writeToFileAsync method using a separate thread. Use the following code as a guide:
    new Thread() {
    public void run() {
    writeToFile(saveState, fileName);
    }
    }.start();
    Note: This code uses an anonymous inner class to declare and instantiate a Thread class. Unlike a traditional inner class, anonymous inner classes are available only within the statement they're declared. You'll see more examples of anonymous classes with Swing in the next lesson. To ensure that local variables are unchanged by the inner class, the parameters saveState and fileName must be declared with the final keyword.
    6. In the main() method of the BoardGameTester project, add the following code:
    FileManager.writeToFileAsync(ticTacToe.toString(), "ttt.txt");
    FileManager.writeToFileAsync(connectFour.toString(), "c4.txt");
    FileManager.writeToFileAsync(mastermind.toString(), "mm.txt");
    7. Compile and run the project to create three files, one for each saved board game. Open the files to ensure they contain the correct game board display.
    Note: Notepad won’t display the line returns in the file. You may need to open the text files using Microsoft Word or Wordpad instead.
    These three game board files will be required for submission.

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  4. Penn foster Graded Project 5 TicTacToe Game GUI Java

    Penn foster Graded Project 5 TicTacToe Game GUI Java

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    Penn foster Graded Project 5 TicTacToe Game GUI Java

    In this project, you'll create the GUI front-end for the TicTacToe game. This application will leverage the classes you wrote in the graded project for Lesson 3. You'll copy code from Graded Project 3 for this project.
    Figure 20 is a guide for the completed user interface.

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. In NetBeans, create a new Java Application project named TicTacToeGUIGame.
    2. Copy the games.board package from the Lesson 3 project named BoardGameTester.
    - Right-click on the game.board package in the BoardGameTester project of the Projects pane panel.
    - Choose the Copy option from the context menu or use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+C.
    - Paste it in the TicTacToeGUIGame project using the Paste option in the context menu or the keyboard shortcut CTRL+V.
    Make sure to copy and paste the package in the Source Packages folder.
    3. In the Cell.java file, have the Cell class extend the JButton class. This action will ensure that each cell on the board has the look and feel of a standard Java button.
    4. Override the paintComponent method in the Cell class as follows:
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            //paint the basic button first
            super.paintComponent(g);
            int offset = 5;
            Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
            g2.setStroke(new BasicStroke(5));
            switch (content) {
                case NOUGHT:
                    g2.setColor(Color.RED);
                    //Draw O
                    g2.drawOval(offset, offset, this.getWidth()
                            - offset * 2, this.getHeight() - offset * 2);
                    break;
                case CROSS:
                    g2.setColor(Color.BLACK);
                    //Draw X
                    g2.drawLine(offset, offset, this.getWidth() - offset,
                            this.getHeight() - offset);
                    g2.drawLine(this.getWidth() - offset, offset, offset,
                            this.getHeight() - offset);
                    break;
            }
        }
    This code uses the enhanced Graphics2D class to set the stroke thickness to more than one pixel. The Oracle documentation provides more guidance on creating complex geometric shapes using the Graphics2D class at http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/2d/geometry/index.html. Remember to import the java.awt and javax.swing packages!
    5. In the Board.java file, have the Board class extend the JPanel class. This action will ensure that the board can lay out each cell and process its UI events.
    6. Make the following modifications to the Board constructor:
    public Board(int rows, int columns, ActionListener ah) {
    cells = new Cell[rows][columns];
    this.setLayout(new GridLayout());
    for( int r = 0; r < cells.length; r++ ) {
    for (int c = 0; c < cells[r].length; c++) {
    cells[r][c] = new Cell(r,c);
    this.add(cells[r][c]);
    cells[r][c].addActionListener(ah);
    }
    }
    }
    These changes will add each cell to the UI and assign an ActionListener object to each cell.
    Note: Remember to import the java.awt, java.awt.event, and javax.swing packages.
    7. In the TicTacToeGUIGame.java file, have the TicTacToeGUIGame class extend JFrame. This action will ensure that the game is hosted in a Java window.
    8. Import the games.board, java.awt, and javax.swing packages.
    9. Add the following code to the main method:
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater( new Runnable () {
    public void run() { new TicTacToeGUIGame(); }
    });
    10. Declare the following instance variables in TicTacToeGUIGame:
    private Board gb;
    private int turn;
    11. Add the following method to handle each turn:
    private void takeTurn(Cell c) {
    Mark curMark = (turn++ % 2 == 0)?Mark.NOUGHT
    : Mark.CROSS;
    gb.setCell(curMark,c.getRow(),c.getColumn());
    }
    12. Define the following constructor to create the board, provide the event listener, and display the board in the window:
    private TicTacToeGUIGame() {
    gb = new Board(3, 3, new ActionListener() {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
    Cell c = (Cell) ae.getSource();
    takeTurn(c);
    }
    });
    this.add(gb);
    this.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    this.setTitle(“TIC-TAC-TOE”);
    this.setSize(300, 300);
    this.setVisible(true);
    }
    13. Compile and run the project. How did you do? Test to make sure that each button displays a nought or cross when clicked.

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  5. Penn foster Graded Final Project TicTacToe Game GUI Java Player 1 Wins

    Penn foster Graded Final Project TicTacToe Game GUI Java

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    Penn foster Graded Final Project TicTacToe Game GUI Java


    In this project, you’ll finish the GUI version of the Tic-Tac-Toe game. This project will require you to rewrite the application logic found in the graded project for Lesson 2, but using object orientation this time. In the instructions, code will be referenced from the previous graded projects.


    Instructions
    1. In NetBeans, open the TicTacToeGUIGame project.
    2. In the TicTacToeGUIGame.java file, make the following changes to the TicTacToeGUIGame class:
    a. Add a new method named getOutcome that returns an Outcome enumeration. Use the winOrTie method in the Lesson 2 graded project as a guide.
    b. In the takeTurn method, use the getOutcome method to determine whether to continue the game.
    c. In the takeTurn method, display a dialog message that displays the winner or tie when the game ends.
    Optionally, you can clear the board and start a new game after it ends.
    Note: You can use the following method to display a dialog message in the current window:
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog (this, "Both players tie.");
    3. Build and run the project. Verify it works as expected. Don’t be discouraged if it doesn’t run as expected right away. Try tracing your steps and using System.out.write statements to figure out where you went wrong.

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  6. CMIS 141 Final Project Titanic

    CMIS 141 Final Project Titanic

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    CMIS 141 Final Project Titanic


    Design a Java application that will read a file containing data related to the passengers on the Titanic. The description of the file is shown below. The application should provide statistical results on the passengers including:
    a. Total number of passengers on the Titanic
    b. Total number of passengers who perished on the Titanic
    c. Total number of Passengers who survived the sinking of the Titanic
    d. Number of passengers who survived the sinking of the Titanic as a function of the passenger class (e.g. 1,2,3)
    e. Number of passengers who survived the sinking of the Titanic as a function of the passenger gender (e.g., male, female)
    f. A list of the names of passengers who paid greater than $200 for their tickets
    g. A list of the names of passengers who were less than 10 years old who survived the sinking of the Titanic
    h. A list of the names of passengers who were less than 10 years old who perished on the Titanic
    i. The count of the number of passengers as a function of the first letter of their last name. (e.g., A: 13, B:33)
    j. Additional statistical results you add to enhance the functionality


    The following are some design criteria and specific requirements that need to be addressed:
    a. Use command line arguments to send in the name of the Titanic file.
    b. Use a 2D array to store the Titanic data. (Hint: You will probably need to store the array as String values and then convert to other types as needed since some data is null)
    c. You should create at least 2 Java classes – Titanic and TestTitanic. You are welcome to create additional classes if you want to further separate the functionality.
    d. You should create separate methods for each of the required functionality. (e.g. getTotalPassengers() will return the total number of passengers on the Titanic.)
    e. A user-friendly and well-organized menu should be used for users to select which data to return. A sample menu is shown in run example. You are free to enhance your design and you should add additional menu items and functionality.
    f. The menu system should be displayed at the command prompt, and continue to redisplay after results are returned or until Q is selected. If a user enters an invalid menu item, the system should redisplay the menu with a prompt asking them to enter a valid menu selection
    g. The application should keep track of the elapsed time (in seconds) between once the application starts and when the user quits the program. After the program is exited, the 2 application should provide a prompt thanking the user for trying the Titanic program and providing the total time elapsed.
    Here is sample run:
    java TestTitanic Titanic.txt
    ********** Welcome to the Titanic Statistical Application **************************
    Enter the number of the question you want answered. Enter ‘Q’ to quit the program :
    1. How many passengers were on the Titanic?
    2. What percentage of passengers perished on the Titanic?
    3. What percentage passengers survived the sinking of the Titanic?
    4. What percentage of passengers survived for each of the three classes?
    5. What percentage of passengers survived as a function of gender?
    6. What specific passengers paid more than $200 for their tickets?
    7. What specific passengers who were less than 10 years old perished on the titanic?
    8. What specific passengers who were less than 10 years old survived the sinking of the titanic?
    9. For each letter in the alphabet, how many passengers last names started with that letter?
    Q. Quit the program
    Enter your selection: 1
    There were 1310 Passengers on the Titanic.


    Submission requirements:
    Your deliverables include all Java files (.java) and a single word (or PDF) document. The Java files should be named appropriately for your applications. Your word document should include screen shots showing the successful compiling and running of each application, and a detailed description of the test plan for each application. The test plan should include the input, expected output, actual output and if the test case passed or failed. Submit your files to the Final Project assignment area no later than the due date listed in the calendar.


    Titanic Data Description:
    The attached tab delimited file, named titanic.txt contains the known passengers on the Titanic. There are 5 fields included in the file in the order:
    Passenger class (1,2,3)
    Survived (1=yes, 0=no)
    Name (Passenger name)
    sex (male or female)
    age (some values are blank)
    fare (some values are blank)

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  7. CMIS 141 Homework 3 HeadPhones Class

    CMIS 141 Homework 3 HeadPhones Class

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    CMIS 141 Homework 3 HeadPhones Class


    1. (25 points) Create a Java class named HeadPhones to represent a headphone set.
    The class contains:
    - Three constants named LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH with values of 1, 2 and 3 to denote the headphone volume.
    - A private int data field named volume that specifies the volume of the headphone. The default volume is MEDIUM.
    - A private boolean data field named pluggedIn that specifies if the headphone is plugged in. The default value if false.
    - A private String data field named manufacturer that specifies the name of the manufacturer of the headphones.
    - A private Color data field named headPhoneColor that specifies the color of the headphones.
    - getter and setter methods for all data fields.
    - A no argument constructor that creates a default headphone.
    - A method named toString() that returns a string describing the current field values of the headphones.
    - A method named changeVolume(value) that changes the volume of the headphone to the value passed into the method
    Create a TestHeadPhones class that constructs at least 3 HeadPhones objects. For each of the objects constructed, demonstrate the use of each of the methods. Be sure to use your IDE to accomplish this assignment.


    2. (25 points) Create your own Java class that represents your favorite musical instrument. Your musical instrument class should have at least 3 constants, 4 private data fields, getters and setters for each private data field, a toString() method, and two additional methods of your choice.
    Create a test class that constructs at least 3 of your musical instrument objects. For each of the objects constructed demonstrate the use of each of the methods. Be sure to use your IDE to accomplish this assignment. You can pick any instrument you want. When designing your class, think about what would make sense to describe and use the instrument.
    For example, if you selected a trumpet, you might need to provide the number of valves, the manufacturer, if the instrument is using a mute, and the volume or even notes the trumpet is playing. Make this your own creation and have fun with it.

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  8. ITSD322 Unit 1 Java console program

    ITSD322 Unit 1 Java console program

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    ITSD322 Unit 1 Java console program


    Throughout this course, you will be learning about object-oriented programming and demonstrating what you learn by writing some programs in Java. The first step will be to install and integrated development environment (IDE) that will be where you will write and compile your programs. You will also write your first program using Java to show that you have correctly installed the IDE.
    The project instructions and deliverables are as follows:
    Download and install Java JDK and NetBeans IDE using the default installation options.
    Run the IDE, and take a screenshot.
    Create a console program that prompts the user to enter the name and address of their employer and position they hold or the name and address of their favorite restaurant and their favorite meal.
    Display this information on the screen, each on a separate line.
    Run your modified program and take a screenshot of the results.
    Create a document in Word, and add the following:
    Title page which includes: CourseNumber, CourseSection, CourseName, ProjectName (Unit 1 IP), StudentName and Date.
    Screen shots showing the IDE running.
    Screen shot showing the program's output.
    Create a zip that includes your project folder and Word document, and upload it to the course portal.

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  9. ITSD322 Unit 2 Java console program

    ITSD322 Unit 2 Java console program

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    ITSD322 Unit 2 Java console program


    The first step in writing a software application is to determine the requirements. There is no value in writing a program that does not address the needs of the client. Requirements can be gathered in many ways, but ultimately, the requirements serve to document what the application should and should not do. After the requirements are written, the application design can be prepared, followed by the actual coding. For this project, you will gain some practice in the design phase of software development by designing a program that will meet a given set of requirements.
    Develop a console program that simulates a section of a restaurant menu. Each item will have a different price and your program should define at least ten (10) items. You will need to obtain an order from the user who should provide their menu selection along with quantity. The total cost for the meal must be calculated. The user will enter the amount of their payment ($10, $20, etc.). The program needs to calculate the amount due back to the user (payment minus total cost of meal).
    The project instructions and deliverables are as follows:
    Create a document in Word (name the design document yourName_Unit2.IP), and add the following:
    Title page
    Course number and name
    Project name
    Student name
    Date
    List the data items that must be stored and used by the program. Each data item should be given a name for reference. Develop a UML class diagram that illustrates the data items for your program.
    List the decisions the program must make. References to the data items in the previous step should be used where appropriate.
    Describe the flow of operation of the program by preparing pseudocode or a UML activity diagram. All key activities should be included, and references to the data items and decisions listed in the previous steps should be used.
    Create a zip that includes your project folder and Word document, and upload it to the course portal.

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  10. CIS355A Week 6 iLab 6 Java Pizza Swing

    CIS355A Week 6 iLab Swing and Database Connection

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    CIS355A Week 6 iLab Swing and Database Connection

    iLAB OVERVIEW
    Scenario/Summary
    Develop one application using JTabbedPanes and JFrames and another application that connects to a MySQL database.
    Deliverables
    1. JavaPizza
    2. ContactList

    iLAB STEPS
    Step 1: JavaPizza
    Develop an application using a JTabbedPane to order a pizza. You will need to ask the customer for their name and phone number. You will ask for the size (choose one) and toppings (choose many) and compute the total. After computing the total, provide a button to display the order summary, which includes the name, phone number, size, toppings, and total. The prices are listed below. Screenshots of a possible solution are included. Your application must include four tabs and open a new window when the button is clicked.
    • Small:  8.00
    • Medium: 10.00
    • Large: 12.00
    Each topping is 2.00 extra.
     
    JavaPizza    Points    Description
    Standard header included    1    Must contain program's name, student name, and description of the program
    Program compiles    1    Program does not have any error
    Program executes    1    Program runs without any error
    Created the JTabbedPane with four tabs    4    The JTabbedPane is displayed with the four required tabs and components on each tab
    Total is calculated correctly    5    The total on the last tab is calculated correctly based on information supplied.
    Order summary window displayed correctly    8    The order summary window is displayed with a JTextArea, including all information from the four tabs.
    Subtotal    20      
     
    Step 2: Contact List
    Develop a Java application to add a contact into the contact table, and display all contacts in the contact table. The contact table contains two columns, FullName, and PhoneNumber. Both values are text data. Use JOptionPanes to ask for the contact data, and display a confirmation message when the contact is added. Display the list of contacts in the console. Screenshots of a possible solution are included.
     
    ContactList    Points    Description
    Standard header included    1    Must contain program's name, student name, and description of the program
    Program compiles    1    Program does not have any error
    Program executes    1    Program runs without any error
    Created the JOptionPanes for input    6    Two JOptionPanes are displayed to retrieve input
    JOptionPane displayed upon insert    4    A JOptionPane is display to confirm the contact was added
    ContactList shown in console    7    The list of contacts is displayed in the console under a heading contact list .
    Subtotal    20

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