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  1. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 11 Case 3 Kiddergarden

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 11 Case 3 Kiddergarden

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    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 11 Case 3 Kiddergarden


    Kiddergarden Pete Burnham manages the Web site kiddergarden, a family-friendly site containing games, puzzles, stories, and other activities. Pete has asked for your help in developing a Web page containing a number guessing game.
    Pete needs you to create a script that generates a random integer between 1 and 500. A user has up to 10 guesses to guess the number. After each guess, the page will tell the user whether his or her guess is too high, too low, or exactly correct. A preview of the page is shown in the Figure 11-40.


    You will be provided with a function named checkEndGame() that displays an alert box telling the user whether he or she has won the game by guessing the number within the allotted number of guesses, or has a lost by failing to guess the correct number. The rest of the code is left for you to complete.


    Complete the following:
    1. Use your text editor to open the guesstxt.htm file from the tutorial.11\case3 folder included with your Data Files. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of the file and save it as guess.htm. Take some time to study the content and structure of the document, including the elements within the guessform web form.


    2. Within the script element, declare the following four global variables: lowest, size, randNum, and guess. The lowest variable will be used to store the lowest possible random integer in the guessing game. The size variable will store the number of random integers in the game. The randNum variable will store the random number generated by the Web page. The guess variable will store the users current guess. Set the initial values of the lowest and size variable to 1 and 500, respectively. Do not set the initial values for the randNum and guess variables.


    3. Below the four variable declarations you just created, insert the generateRandom() function. The function, will be used to generate a random number, has no parameters. It should contain a single statement to set the value of randNum variable to a random integer between the values of the lowest and size variables. (Hint: Use the code describing how to generate random integers presented in the tutorial to aid you in writing this function.)


    4. Insert a function named reportResult() that display the result of each guess. The function has no parameters and should include the following commands:
    a. Set the value of the guess variable to the value of the guess field in the guessform Web form. Use the eval() method to convert the text in the field to a numeric field.
    b. Declare a variable named result that will contain the result of the users guess. Use nested conditional operator to set the value of result to the text right! if guess equals randNum; if guess is greater than randNum, set the value of result to the text string too high; otherwise, set the value result to the text string too low.
    c. Reduce the value of the guesses field in the guessform Web form by 1 to indicate that the user has one fewer guess left.
    d. Set the value of result field in the guessform Web form to the value of the result variable.
    e. Call the checkEndGame()function to test whether the game has been concluded by the user.


    5. Create a function named resetGame(). The purpose of this function is to reset the game with a new random number and a new set of guesses. The function has no parameters and should include the following commands:
    a. Set the value of the guesses field in the guessform Web form to 10.
    b. Set the value of the guess field in the guessform Web form to an empty text string ("").
    c. Set the value of the result field to an empty text string ("").
    d. Call the generateRandom() function.


    6. Add an onload event handler to the <body> tag to run the generateRandom() function when the browser initially loads the page.


    7. Add an onclick event handler to the input element for the guess button to run the reportResult() function when the button is clicked.


    8. Add an onclick event handler to the Play Again button to run the resetGame() function when the button is clicked.


    9. Save your changes to the file, and then load the guess.htm in your Web browser. Verify that the page generates a random number, and that it reports whether your guess is too high, too low, or correct when you enter a number in a guess field and click the Guess button. Further verify that the number of guesses remaining counts down by 1 starting from 10 and going to 0.


    10. Submit your completed project to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.

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  2. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 11 Case 2 The Math Table

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 11 Case 2 The Math Table

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    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 11 Case 2 The Math Table


    The Math Table Theresa Kaine runs The Math Table, a Web site containing math resourses for homeschooling families and educators. She wants to add an online calculator to the site and has asked for your help in designing a simple prototype. Theresa already has designed the Web page and would like you to write the JavaScript code to make the calculator work. A preview of Theresa's sample Web page is shown in Figure 11-39.
    The calculator is actually a Web table using CSS styles to give it the appearance of a calculator. Each calculator button is a form button and the calculator screen is a textarea element. When a user clicks a calculator button, the number or symbol represented by the button should be appended to the text on the calculator screen.
    When the user clicks the equal button( = ), the calculator should evaluate the expression and display the calculated value. When the user clicks the Clear button, the text in the calculator screen should be replaced with an empty text string. Finally, when the user clicks the backspace button(<-), the browser should remove the last character on the calculator screen. To aid you in programming the backspace key, Theresa has provided a function named erase(). You will create all of the other JavaScript functions yourself.


    Complete the following:

    1. Use your text editor to open the calctxt.htm file from the tutorial.11\case2 folder included with your Data Files. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of the file. Save the file as calculator.htm in the same folder.
    2. In your text editor, scroll down to the Web table elements and locate the input elements for the 0 through 9 buttons; the /, *, -, and + buttons; the (and) buttons; and the . button. For each of those 17 buttons, and an onclick attribute to run the statement
    calcPress('value')
    where value is the number or character displayed on the button.
    3. Locate the input element for the Clear button and add an onclick attribute to run the clearWin() function when the button is clicked.
    4. Locate the input element for the backspace button (<-) and add an onclick attribute to run the erase() function when the button is clicked.
    5. Add an onclick attribute to the equal button (=) to run the calcExpression() function when the button is clicked.
    6. Scroll to the top of the file and add the calcPress() function to the embedded script element. The purpose of this function is to append a symbol to the text displayed in the calculator screen. The calcPress() function should include the following:
    a. A single parameter named symbol
    b. A command that uses the += operator to add the value of the symbol parameter to the value of the calcwindow field within the calculator form
    7. Create a function named calcExpression(). The purpose of this function is to append the calculated value to the expression displayed on the calculator screen. The function has no parameters. Add the following commands:
    a. Declare a variable named cString that is equal to the text contained in the calcwindow field of the calculator form.
    b. Use the eval() method to store the numeric value of cString in a variabe named cValue.
    c. Change the text string value of the calcwindw field from the calculator form to
    cString = cValue
    where cString is the value of the cString variable and cValue is the value of the cValue variable.
    8. Create a function named clearWinn(). The purpose of this function is to erase the contents of the calculator screen. The function has no parameters but should have a single command that changes the value of the calcwindow field in the calculator field in the calculator to an empty text string ("").
    9. Save your changes to the files.
    10. Open the calculator.htm file in your Web browser. Click the different calculator buttons and verify that you can enter a mathematical expression into the calculator. Click the backspace button (<-) and verify that you can erase the last character from the screen Click the equal button (=) and verify that the calculator adds the calculated numeric value to the expression. Finally, click the Clear button and verify that all of the text is removed from the calculator screen.
    11. Submit your completed project to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.

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  3. ITCO381 Unit 1 IP assignment

    ITCO381 Unit 1 IP assignment

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    ITCO381 Unit 1 IP assignment


    In an era where Web sites are highly dynamic, interactive, and database dependent, a static Web page consisting of only HTML may seem archaic. However, Web developers must begin somewhere and a good understanding of the language of the Web (HTML) is the right place to start. You have decided to develop a static Web page that contains valid HTML as the newsletter for an organization that interests you.


    Create a static Web page that includes the basic structure of a valid HTML (not XHTML) document. Make sure to include the language attribute of the html element and the character set attribute of the metadata element. You may want to save this basic document as the starting structure for development of all static Web pages.
    Continue to structure the newsletter using the HTML semantic elements
    header
    section
    footer
    Within the structure of the newsletter add other HTML elements including at least one:
    heading
    paragraph
    image that implements accessibility guidelines
    navigation that includes a
    list of at least
    four links that
    navigate to actual Web pages and
    implement accessibility guidelines
    Use of any inline elements should follow current standards
    No style should be applied
    Validate the finished web page.
    Zip (compress) the into a .zip file.
    Please submit your assignment.


    Grading
    You will be graded on the content, structure, and validity of your final HTML page.

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  4. New Perspectives on HTML and CSS Edition 6 Tutorial 7 Case Problem 3 Franklin High School

    New Perspectives on HTML and CSS Edition 6 Tutorial 7 Case Problem 3 Franklin High School

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    New Perspectives on HTML and CSS Edition 6 Tutorial 7 Case Problem 3 Franklin High School


    Franklin High School Fractals are geometric objects that closely model the seemingly chaotic world of nature. Doug Hefstadt, a mathematics teacher at Franklin High School in Lake Forest, Illinois, has just begun a unit on fractals for his senior math class. He's used the topic of fractals to construct a Web page to be placed on the school network, and he needs your help to complete the Web page. He has a video clip of a fractal that he wants placed in the Web page, along with a Java applet that allows students to interactively explore the Mandelbrot Set, a type of fractal object. He wants our assistance with putting these two objects in his Web page. A preview of the page you'll create is shown in Figure 7-47.


    Complete the following:
    1. Use your text editor to open the fractaltxt.htm file from the tutorial.07\case3 folder included with your Data Files. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of the file. Save the file as fractal.htm in the same folder.
    2. Scroll down to the figure element. Directly above the figure caption, insert a video element. Set the width and height of the video to 320 pixels by 260 pixels. Add attributes to display the zoom.png file as a poster image for the video, and have the video automatically loop back to the beginning when played. Display the mandel.mp4 and mandel.webm Video files in the player. Display the video controls in the player.
    3. Within the video element, nest an object element displaying the mandel.swf Flash player. Add an attribute and a parameter to loop the player back to the beginning when played.
    4. If the browser does not support flash player, display a message telling the user that he or she must have the Shockwave player. Include a link too the Website where the user can download the player.
    5. Scroll down to the article element, Within the paragraph in this element, insert an object element containing the Java applet for the Mandel.class file; set the width of the Java window to 280 pixels and height to 240 pixels.
    6. If your browser does not support Java, have it display the text Your browser does not support Java applets in place of the Mandel.class applet.
    7. Save your changes to the file.
    8. Open the Web page in an HTML5-enabled browser and verify the video plays correctly.
    9. Open the Web page in a browser that does not support HTML5 but support Flash, and verify that you can play the Flash video. If the browser does not support HTML5 and Flash, verify that the browser displays a message indicating that the user should install Flash. Re-enable Flash if you disabled it.
    10. Test the fractal applet to verify that you can use it to zoom into the Mandelbrot Set at different levels of magnification.
    11. Disable Java support and verify that the browser displays a message indicating that you should install Java. Re-enable Java support in the browser.
    12. Submit your completed files to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.

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  5. CIS363A Week 3 iLab 3 Create a Web Page Using CSS in Dreamweaver

    CIS363A Week 3 iLab 3 Create a Web Page Using CSS in Dreamweaver

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    CIS363A Week 3 iLab 3 Create a Web Page Using CSS in Dreamweaver


    iLAB OVERVIEW
    Scenario and Summary
    Create an index.html file and create an external CSS file based on the specifications given in the assignment.
    You will need to create an internal and external CSS.
    You will also need to attach an external CSS file to the original page.


    Deliverables
    index.html with attached external CSS sheet
    style.css file


    iLAB STEPS
    Lab Preparation
    Download the lab3Content.docx document found in Doc Sharing.


    Part A: Create HTML and CSS Files (3 Points)
    Step 1: Create a New HTML File (1 point)
    Open Dreamweaver and create a new HTML page.
    Enter index.html as the web page name.


    Step 2: Copy Content From the Word Document (1 point)
    Open the lab3Content document found in Doc Sharing.
    Paste the content into the index.html page.


    Step 3: Create a CSS File (1 point)
    Create a new CSS page.
    Save the file and name it styles.css.
    Note: If your styles.css file does not show when needed in the remaining steps, then click on the attach stylesheet icon, select browse, locate the styles.css file, and then click OK. (The styles.css will automatically be linked to the index.html file in the head section of the code.)


    Part B: Internal CSS (22 Points)
    Step 1: Create an Internal CSS (10 points)
    Go to the index.html file and create an internal CSS for the following properties. Use the Page Properties option in the Properties Panel.
    Background color for the body A light tan: #FC6
    Font color for all text in the body A dark blue: #039
    Font for all text in the body Comic Sans MS
    Font size for all the text in the body Body: 14 points
    Link color for all links Dark red: #CC0000
    Visited link color for all links Dark red: #CC0000
    Rollover link color for all links Dark green: #060
    Active link color for all links Dark red: #CC0000
    No link should be underlined for all links Never underline


    Step 2: Apply Internal CSS (12 points)
    Your index.html page should reflect the styles from above.
    Go back to Page Properties if the page did not update with your internal CSS.


    Part C: Tag CSS (22 Points)
    Step 1: Create Tag CSS (10 Points)
    For all of the following tags, create the CSS rule from the descriptions below.
    Hint: To create a CSS, you need to click on the New CSS Rule in the CSS panel on the right-hand side. Watch Adobe TV on best practices for creating a style sheet. You will need to enter Style Sheets or CSS in the Adobe TV searchbox (http://help.adobe.com/en_US/dreamweaver/cs/using/WScbb6b82af5544594822510a94ae8d65-7e32a.html).
    H2 Text color: #333, bold
    H3 Background color: #39f
    Border on the bottom with the following rules
    Width: thin
    Style: solid
    Color: #003
    Centered text
    Margin on all sides: 35 pixels
    p Font: Georgia
    Text color: #030
    Padding of 15 pixels on all sides
    li Font family: Arial
    Background color: gray
    Text color:black, bold
    Text size: 18 points


    Step 2: Apply Tag CSS (12 points)
    Apply the new tag CSS to the content on the page.


    Part D: Class CSS (23 Points)
    Step 1: Create a Class CSS (10 points)
    Create a new CSS rule using a class CSS. You will need to select the option to include the class CSS to the styles.css file.


    Navtable: This class will be applied to a navigation table. Font family: Times Roman
    Background color: #0ff
    Text color: bold, center


    example1:This class will be applied to Example 1.
    Background color: #699
    Text color: #033, bold
    Text size: 10 points
    Margin on all sides: 25 pixels
    Padding on all sides: 25 pixels


    example2:This class will be applied to Example 2.
    Background color: #66c
    Border on all sides with the following rules
    Width: 10px
    Style: solid
    Color: #06c
    Text size: 10 pixels
    Text color: #ccc


    header:This class will be applied to the heading "IEBGENER STUDY GUIDE."
    Font family: Arial
    Background color: #6ff
    Text color: 030
    Text size: 36 points
    Margin on all sides: 50 pixels
    Padding on all sides: 50 pixels


    Step 2: Apply the Class CSS (12 points)
    Apply the class CSS as done in the class CSS steps above.


    Step 3: Upload Zipped File (1 point)
    Your index.html page should have all inline, tags, and class CSS applied.
    Create a folder called CIS363A_YourLastName_Lab3.
    Put copies of each required deliverable into the new folder.
    Right-click on the folder and select Send To -> Compressed (zipped) Folder. You can also use other tools to compress the files into a single zip folder (e.g., 7-zip).
    Upload the zip file to the weekly iLab Dropbox in eCollege.

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  6. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 13 Case 1 Twin Life Magazine Large Font

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 13 Case 1 Twin Life Magazine

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    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 13 Case 1 Twin Life Magazine


    Twin Life Magazine Elise Howard is the editor of Twin Life, a magazine for parents of twins, triplets, and other multiple births. The magazine is upgrading its Web site and Elise has approached you to help with the website design. She would like to give readers the ability to increase or decrease the font size of the articles the magazine publishes to make the text easier to read, or to allow readers to view an entire article on the same screen. Although readers can use their Web browsers to zoom in and zoom out of the Web pages, Elise wants an app that will affect only the article text and accompanying photo, while leaving the rest of page features - the magazine logo and list of links - unaffected.
    To create this effect, her sample page has two buttons: one to increase the font size and other to decrease it. All text and page objects that are to be resized have been set using the relative em unit, while the other page text and objects that are to remain fixed in size have been set in pixels. Thus to change the size of all of the resizable objects, your code simply needs to change the default size of the document page body; all of the resizable objects will change proportionally based on the default font size. Figure 13-39 shows a preview of the article and resizing buttons that you'll work on for Twin Life.


    Complete the following:
    1. Using your text editor, open twinstxt.htm, tlmtxt.css, and fonttxt.js from the tutorial.13\case1 folder. Enter your name and the date in the head section, and then save the files as twins.htm, tlm.css, and fontsizer.js, respectively.
    2. Go to the twins.htm file in your text editor and add a script element linking to the fontsizer.js file.
    3. Scroll down the file and locate the fontbuttons div element, which contains two image buttons. Place both image buttons in the fontsizer class. Set the values associated with those buttons to -0.1 for the fontdown.png image and 0.1 for fontup.png.
    4. Save your changes to the file, and then go to the tlm.css file in your text editor.
    5. At the bottom of the file, insert a style rule to set the width of the inline image within the figure box in the article element to 12em.
    6. Add another rule to set the font size of paragraph text within the article element to 1em.
    7. Save your changes to the file, and then go to the fontsizer.js file in your text editor.
    8. Add a command to run the startup() function when the page is initially loaded by the browser.
    9. Create the startup() function. The purpose of this function is to apply onclick event handlers to the two font resize buttons. Create the fontButtons variable containing all of the page elements that belong to the fontsizer class. Loop through that collection and add an event handler to each item in the collection to run the resizeText() function when clicked.
    10. Create the resizeText() function. The purpose of this function is to change the default font size of the document body based on the value of the font button being clicked. When that value is changed, all object sizes based on em units automatically will be resized. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Using the parseFloat() function, store the numeric value of the button being clicked in the fontChange variable.
    b. Next, you must determine whether an inline style has been used to set the default document body font size. First, test whether the font size of the document body is equal to an empty text string. If it is, set the font size to 1.0em. (Hint: Use the reference document.body to reference the document body.)
    c. Use the parseFloat() function to store the numeric value of the document body font size in the currentFontSize variable.
    d. Change the document body font size to the text string current font size + font change + "em" where current font size is the value of the currentFontSize variable and font change is the value of the fontChange variable.
    11. Document your code with appropriate comments throughout.
    12. Save your changes to the file, and then load twins.htm in your Web browser. Verify that when you click the buttons to increase or decrease the font size, the paragraph text and the size of the author’s photo change in response, but no other part of the Web page changes in size.
    13. Submit your completed files to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.

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  7. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 12 Case 1 The Lighthouse

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 12 Case 1 The Lighthouse

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    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 12 Case 1 The Lighthouse


    The Lighthouse is a charitable organization located in central Kentucky that matches donors with needy groups. The fundraising coordinator for The Lighthouse is Aaron Kitchen. On an administration Web page available only to Lighthouse staff, Aaron wants to display a list of information on recent donations, including the name and address of the donor, the amount donated, and the date of the donation. A list of donations from the last month has been downloaded from an external database and stored in a collection of arrays named firstName, lastName, street, city, state, zip, amount, and date. Aaron needs your help with displaying the data from those arrays in a Web table. He also wants a summary table that displays the total number of contributors and the total contribution amount. Figure 12-36 shows a preview of the Web page you’ll create.


    Complete the following:
    1. Using your text editor, open clisttxt.htm and tablestxt.js from the tutorial.12\case1 folder. Enter your name and the date in the head section, and then save the files as clist.htm and tables.js, respectively.
    2. Go to the clist.htm file in your text editor. The firstName, lastName, street, city, state, zip, amount, and date arrays have been created and populated for you in the april.js file. In the head section of the document, insert a script element that points to this file.
    3. Aaron already has created a style sheet for the tables that will display the list of contributors and the summary of their contributions. Add a link to the tables.css style sheet in the Web page.
    4. Save your changes to the file, and then go to the tables.js file in your text editor.
    5. Add a function named showTable() that will be used to display the table containing the contributor list. The function has no parameters. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Write the following code to the document to create the header row for the table of contributions:
    <table id='contributors'>
    <thead>
    <tr>
    <th>Date</th><th>Amount</th>
    <th>First Name</th><th>Last Name</th>
    <th>Address</th>
    </tr>
    </thead>
    b. Write the <tbody> tag to the document.
    c. Next, you’ll create a table row for each person listed in the lastName array. Create a for loop that loops through each entry in the lastName array. Each time through the loop, write the HTML code
    <tr>
    <td>date</td>
    <td class='amt'>amount</td>
    <td>firstName</td>
    <td>lastName</td>
    <td>street <br />
    city, state zip
    </td>
    </tr>
    to the document, where date, amount, firstName, lastName, street, city, state, and zip are the items from the date, amount, firstName, lastName, street, city, and zip arrays, respectively, corresponding to the value from the counter variable in the for loop.
    d. After the for loop, write the </tbody> tag to close off the table body.
    e. Write the </table> tag to close off the Web table.
    6. Create a function named showSummary() that will be used to calculate and display the total number of contributors and the total amount of contributions. The function has no parameters. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Declare the total variable, setting its initial value to 0.
    b. Loop through each of the entries in the amount array, adding each item's value to the total variable.
    c. Write the HTML code
    <table id='sumTable'>
    <tr>
    <th id='sumTitle' colspan='2'>Summary</th>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <th>Contributors</th>
    <td>contributors</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <th>Amount</th>
    <td>$total</td>
    </tr>
    </table>
    to the document, where contributors is the length of the lastName array and total is the value of the total variable.
    7. Document your code using descriptive comments. Close the file, saving your changes, and then return to the clist.htm file in your text editor.
    8. Add a script element to link to the tables.js file you created.
    9. Scroll down to the figure box for the contribution totals. Within the figure box, insert a script element that runs the showSummary() function.
    10. Scroll down to the figure box for the contributors data list. Within the figure box, insert a script element that runs the showTable() function.
    11. Save your changes to the file, and then open clist.htm in your Web browser. Verify that the summary and contributor list tables appear as shown in Figure 12-36.
    12. Submit your completed files to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.

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  8. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 10 Case 3 MidWest Student Union

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 10 Case 3 MidWest Student Union

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    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 10 Case 3 MidWest Student Union


    MidWest Student Union Sean Lee manages the Web site for the student union at MidWest University in Salina, Kansas. The student union provides daily activities for the students on campus. As Web site manager, part of Sean's job is to keep the Web site up to date on the latest activities sponsored by the union. At the beginning of each week, she revises a set of seven Web pages detailing the events for each day in the upcoming week.
    Sean would like the Web site to display the current day's schedule in an inline frame within the Web page titled Today at the Union. To do this, her Web page must be able to determine the day of the week and then load the appropriate file into the frame. She would also like the Today at the Union page to display the current day and date. Figure 10-39 shows a preview of the page she wants you to create.


    Sean has created the layout of the page, and she needs you to write the scripts to insert the current date and the calendar of events for the current day. To assist you, she has located two functions:
    • The showDate() function returns a text string containing the current date in the format Weekday, Month Day, Year. The function has no parameter values.
    • The weekDay() function returns a text string containing the name of the current weekday, from Sunday through Saturday. This function also has no parameter values.
    The two functions are stored in an external JavaScript file named functions.js. The daily schedules have been stored in files named sunday.htm through saturday.htm.


    Complete the following:
    1. Use your text editor to open the todaytxt.htm file from the tutorial.10\case3 folder included with your Data Files. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of the file and save it as today.htm.
    2. In the head section just above the closing </head> tag, insert a script element accessing the functions.js file.
    3. Scroll down the file and locate the div element with the id dateBox. Within this element insert a script element. The script should run the following two commands:
    a. Write the following HTML code to the Web page:
    Today is<br/>
    b. Write the text string returned by the showDate() function to the Web document.
    4. Scroll down the file and locate the h1 heading with the text Today at the Union. Within the empty paragraph that follows this heading, insert another script element. Within the script element, do the following:
    a. Insert the following multiline comment:
    Display the daily schedule in an inline frame.
    Daily schedules are stored in the files sunday.
    htm through saturday.htm.
    b. Insert a command to write the HTML code
    <iframe src='weekday.htm'></iframe>
    to the Web page, where weekday is the text string returned by the weekDay() function.
    5. Save your changes to the document.
    6. Open today.htm in your Web browser. Verify that it shows the current date and that the daily schedule matches the current weekday.
    7. If you have the ability to change your computer's date and time, change the date to different days of the week and reload (not simply refresh) the Web page. Verify that the date and the daily schedule change to match the new date you selected. Debug your code as necessary.
    8. Submit your completed files to your instructor.

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  9. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 8 Case 1 dessertWeb

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 8 Case 1 dessertWeb

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    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 8 Case 1 dessertWeb


    dessertWeb Amy Wu has asked for your help in redesigning her Web site, dessertWeb, taking advantage of some of the new CSS3 styles. The dessertWeb Web site is a cooking site for people who want to share dessert recipes and learn about cooking in general. In addition to redesigning the site’s appearance, she wants you to create a print style sheet so that users can easily print out recipes and ingredient lists without having to print the headers, footers, and navigation lists that appear on each Web page. Figure 8-64 shows a preview of the screen version of the page.


    Complete the following:
    1. In your text editor, open the recipetxt.htm and dweffectstxt.css files from the tutorial.08\case1 folder included with your Data Files. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of each file. Save the files as recipe.htm and dweffects.css, respectively.
    2. Go to the dweffects.css file in your text editor. Create a style rule for the body element to add two box shadows. One shadow should be placed on the right edge of the page body with the color value (211, 211, 211) and an opacity of 0.5. Set the horizontal offset to 10 pixels, the vertical offset to 0 pixels, and the blur to 15 pixels. Create the same drop shadow on the left edge of the page body as well.
    3. Apply the following style rules to each list item in the horizontal navigation list of the page header: a) set the background color to the value (224, 238, 238); b) add rounded corners 10 pixels in radius; and c) create two inset box shadows: one white shadow located in the upper-left corner offset 3 pixels in the horizontal and vertical direction with a blur of 2 pixels, and the other, a shadow in the lower-right corner with a color value of (147, 207, 207) offset 5 pixels in the horizontal and vertical direction with a blur of 5 pixels.
    4. Add box shadows to the article element with the following properties: a) create an inset box shadow in the lower-right corner with a color value of (171, 171, 171), offset 15 pixels in the horizontal and vertical direction, and with a blur of 75 pixels; and b) create an external shadow located in the lower-right corner with a color value of (101, 101, 101), offset 5 pixels in the vertical and horizontal direction with a blur of 5 pixels.
    5. Add a horizontal background gradient to the blockquote element with the following properties: a) set the gradient to go from the left to the right starting with the color value (166, 230, 230), having a color stop at the 5% point with a value (231, 231, 231), and ending with the color value (255, 255, 255) 15% of the way across the block quote; b) create the same color gradient using the WebKit gradient() function with a color stop for the middle color occurring at the 33% point; and c) using the Internet Explorer Gradient filter, create a horizontal gradient that starts with the hexadecimal color value DEF4F4 and ends with the value FFFFFF.
    6. Save your changes to the file, and then return to the recipe.htm file in your text editor. Add a link to the dweffects.css style sheet file. Specify that the dwlayout.css and dweffects.css style sheets should be used with screen devices.
    7. Save your changes to the document, and then view the page in your Web browser. Verify that the appearance of the page resembles that shown in Figure 8-64. (Note: If you are using Internet Explorer version 8 or earlier, your page will show only the gradient effect around the block quotes, and the gradient will go from light teal to white.)
    8. Figure 8-65 shows a preview of the printed version of the recipe page, displaying the recipe description and ingredients on the first page and the directions on the second page. In your text editor, open the dwprinttxt.css file from the tutorial.08/case1 folder. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of the file, and then save it as dwprint.css.
    9. Set the page size of the printout to 8.5 3 11 inches in portrait orientation with a margin of 0.5 inch.
    10. Hide the following page elements on the printout: page header, left section, right section, all navigation lists, the aside element, the page footer, the h2 element nested within a heading group, and the last paragraph in the article element.
    11. Set the font size of all h1 headings to 200% with a bottom margin of 0.2 inches. Set the font size of all h2 elements to 150% with a top margin of 0.5 inches.
    12. Set the line height of all list items to 1.5 em.
    13. Set the left margin of all ordered lists to 0.5 inches, displaying a decimal value.
    14. Set a page break to always occur before the last h2 element in the page.
    15. Save your changes to the file, and then return to the recipe.htm file in your text editor. Add a link to the dwprint.css style sheet file, setting the style sheet to be used with a print device.
    16. Save your changes to the document, and then view the printed version of the file or preview the printed version in your Web browser. Verify that the contents and layout resemble that shown in Figure 8-65.
    17. Submit your completed files to your instructor.

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  10. CIS 273 Lab Assignment 2 Home Page

    CIS 273 Lab Assignment 2 Three Web Pages with Hyperlinks

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    CIS 273 Lab Assignment 2 Three Web Pages with Hyperlinks

    Follow the directions below to complete Lab Assignment 2:
    1. Create three (3) Web pages: index.htm, tips.htm, and glossary.htm. Open and close all tags appropriately using the correct tags.
    2. Display your name in the title bar of the browser, declare the DOCTYPE for HTML5, and create a comment listing the lab number, the author, and the date.
    3. Create links on each page that link to the other two (2) pages.
    4. Create navigation links on each page that link to the other two (2) pages.
    5. On the home page, create an image linked to http://strayer.edu.
    6. Create alternate text for the image link that says "Strayer University."
    7. On the glossary.htm page, create a definition list of at least five (5) terms and their definitions.
    8. In the definition list, create bold tags for the terms only (not the definition).
    9. Display the special characters "<" and ">" somewhere in the term definitions.
    10. On the glossary.htm page, create at least two (2) links to areas on the same page.

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