HTML/JS

6 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction
  1. CIS 273 Techincal Project Business Website

    CIS 273 Techincal Project Business Website

    Regular Price: $25.00

    Special Price: $20.00

    CIS 273 Lab Assignment 10 Business Website


    This assignment consists of three (3) sections: a narrative, a storyboard, and a business Website. You must submit all three (3) sections for the completion of this assignment. The assignment is to be submitted in a single compressed folder (zip file) to the online course shell. Section 3 must contain all .htm files, along with any other files that may be necessary for your project to run (ex: text files, images, etc.). When saving the compressed folder (zip file), it should be saved as Techincal Project_Last name_First initial.zip. For example, if your name is Mary Smith, the file for submission should be saved as Techincal Project_Smith_M.htm
    Select a business that you are interested in. (e.g., pet store, travel site, fishing gear, appliances, automobiles, housewares, furniture, etc.). Imagine that you have just been hired to create a four (4) page hierarchical Website for the business you selected.


    Section 1: Narrative
    Write a half (1/2) page paper in which you:
    1. Create a narrative that describes the site to your prospective client.


    Section 2: Storyboard
    Imagine that your narrative has been approved. Use Word, Visio, or Dia to:
    2. Create a storyboard diagram depicting the layout of your Website.


    Section 3: Business Website
    In order to receive full credit for this section, you will need to submit:
    1) One (1) screen shot of your emailed data from the guestbook.
    2) One (1) CSS style sheet.
    3) Four (4) Web pages.


    3. Create your Website based on the following requirements:
    a. Create a Cascading Style Sheet (.css) for all pages, which:
    i. Applies a background color.
    ii. Applies style to font.
    iii. Changes the ordered list markers to anything other than the default.
    iv. Changes the unordered list markers to anything other than the default.
    v. Applies style to a copyright footer.


    b. Include:
    i. A graphic or logo on the home page.
    ii. A navigation bar with links to every other page on the home page.
    iii. A guestbook registry on the home page using the mailto: tag with an entry field for:
    a. A person’s name.
    b. An email address.
    iv. A piece of JavaScript on the home page.


    c. Create a submit button for the guestbook registry that will email the information to your email address. Note: Test the function and take a screen shot of the emailed information you receive. You must submit the screen shot in your zipped file of deliverables as proof.


    d. Create three (3) sub pages that include:
    i. The same graphic / logo.
    ii. A navigation bar with links to every other page.
    iii. An ordered list of at least two (2) items, and then at least two (2) unordered list entries under each ordered list item where one (1) of the items must be a hyperlinked to a Website (the hyperlink should not show the address printed on the page).
    Note: Each of the three pages should have unique lists.
    Example:
    A. Food
    ? Dry food
    ? Wet food
    ? Canned food
    B. Toys
    ? Indoor
    ? Outdoor


    The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:
    1) Describe the structure of the World Wide Web as interconnected hypertext documents.
    2) Create and validate HTML documents.
    3) Create presentations using Cascading Style Sheets and DHTML.
    4) Write clearly and concisely about Web design and development using proper writing mechanics and technical style conventions.

    Learn More
  2. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 14 Case 2 JSWorks

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 14 Case 2 JSWorks

    Regular Price: $25.00

    Special Price: $20.00

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 14 Case 2 JSWorks


    Data Files needed for this Case Problem: js.css, jslogo.png, modernizr-1.5.js, nodestxt.htm, tree.css, treetxt.js


    JSWorks Jorge Soto is the owner and administrator of JSWorks, a Web site containing JavaScript tutorials, tips, and specialized apps. Jorge is working on a multipage tutorial concerning the creation and use of document nodes. You are helping Jorge maintain his Web site. You've volunteered to work on his Web page that describes the appearance of the document node tree. Jorge would like you to include a node tree that is based on the article he's writing so that visitors to his site can see the complete appearance of the node tree for a sample HTML fragment. Figure 14-67 shows a preview of the Web page you'll complete for Jorge.


    The JavaScript program you'll design will need to use recursion to navigate through the entire structure of Jorge's article. As it proceeds through the article, it will record each element, attribute, and text node and display those nodes in a nested list alongside the article text. The CSS styles for the nested list already have been created for you; your only job will be to generate the HTML code of the nested list. Jorge also wants your code to keep a running count of the total number of nodes, element nodes, attributes, and text nodes, including text nodes containing only white space.
    Complete the following:
    1. Using your text editor, open nodestxt.htm and treetxt.js from the tutorial.14\case2 folder. Enter your name and the date in the comment section, and then save the files as nodes.htm and tree.js, respectively.
    2. Go to the nodes.htm file in your text editor and add a link element to connect the document to the tree.css style sheet. Also add a script element to connect the file to the tree.js JavaScript file.
    3. Take some time to study the contents and structure of the document and then close the file, saving your changes.
    4. Go to the tree.js file in your text editor. Declare the following global variables: nodeCount to keep a running count of all of the nodes in the source document; elemCount to count the element nodes; attCount to count the attribute nodes; textCount to count the text nodes; and wsCount to count the text nodes containing white space only. Set the initial value of all of these variables to 0.
    5. Insert a command to run the setup() function when the page is initially loaded by the browser.
    6. Create the writeElemLI() function. The purpose of this function is to create a single list item for the node tree diagram based on the contents of an element node. The structure of the list item is shown in Figure 14-68.
    The function has two parameters: elemNode, which represents the element node from the source document on which the list item is based, and nestedList, which represents the nested list that the list item will be appended to. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Create a list item element named liElem containing the text string +--.
    b. Create a span element named spanElem. Set the class attribute of the span element to elemLI. (Hint: Use the className property to set the value of the class attribute.)
    c. Declare a variable named elemText setting its initial value to the text string <elem where elem is the node name of the element specified in the elemNode parameter.
    d. Next you'll examine all of the attribute nodes for the element specified by the elemNode parameter. Create a for loop to go through the nodes in the attributes collection for the elemNode parameter. Each time through the loop increase the value of the nodeCount and attCount variables by 1. Also add the following text string to the value of the elemText variable att='value'
    where att is the node name of the attribute node and value is the node value of the attribute node.
    e. After the for loop completes, append the text string > to the value of the elemText variable.
    f. Create a new text node named elemTextNode containing the text of the elemText variable.
    g. Append elemTextNode to spanElem; append spanElem to liElem; and finally, append liElem to nestedList.
    7. Create the writeTextLI() function. The purpose of this function is to create a single list item for the node tree diagram based on the contents of a text node. The structure of the list item will be one of the two structures shown in Figure 14-69.
    The function has two parameters: textNode, which represents the text node from the source document on which the list item is based, and nestedList, which represents the nested list that the list item will be appended to. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Create the liElem variable for a list item element node containing the text string +--.
    b. Create the spanElem variable for a span element node.
    c. Store the node value of the textNode parameter in the variable textString.
    d. Jorge has provided a function named isWhiteSpaceNode() to determine whether
    a text node represents white space or not. Call the isWhiteSpaceNode() function using textString as the parameter value.
    e. If the isWhiteSpaceNode() function returns the value true, then: i) increase the value of the wsCount variable by 1; ii) set the class name of spanElem to wsLI; and iii) set the inner HTML of spanElem to the text string #text.
    f. If the isWhiteSpaceNode() function returns the value false, then: i) set the class name of spanElem to textLI; and ii) set the inner HTML of spanElem to the value of the nodeValue property for the textNode parameter.
    g. Append the spanElem node to the liElem node, and then append the liElem node to the nestedList parameter.
    8. Create the makeTree() function. The purpose of this function is to recursively generate all of the nested lists contained in the node tree diagram. The function has two parameters: sourceNode, which represents the current node in the source document being added to the node tree diagram, and nestedList, which represents the nested list in the tree diagram that is being written. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Increase the value of the nodeCount variable by 1.
    b. Using the nodeType property, determine whether sourceNode represents an element node or a text node. If it represents an element node, increase the value of the elemCount variable by 1 and call the writeElemLI() function using sourceNode and nestedList as parameter values. If it represents a text node, increase the value of the textCount variable by 1 and call the writeTextLI() function using sourceNode and nestedList as parameter values.
    c. Use the childNodes.length property value to determine whether sourceNode contains any child nodes. If it does, then do the following: i) declare the newList variable containing an element node for the ol element; ii) store the text string | in newList; iii) loop through all of the child nodes for sourceNode, and for each child node call the makeTree() function using the child node and newList as the values for the sourceNode and nestedList parameters; and iv) after the loop has finished, append newList to nestedList.
    9. Create the setup() function. The purpose of this function is to set up the node tree diagram and report the results. The function has no parameters. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Declare the sourceNode variable referencing the article element with the id main in the current document.
    b. Declare the treeBox variable containing an aside element node. Set the id of treeBox to treeBox and set the innerHTML property to h1 Node Tree </h1>.
    c. Declare the newList variable containing an ol element node, and then call the makeTree() function using sourceNode and newList as parameter values.
    d. Append newList as a child of treeBox.
    e. Append treeBox as a child of the section element with the id main.
    f. Using the innerHTML property, display the values of the nodeCount, elemCount, attCount, textCount, and wsCount variables within the span elements whose ids are totalNodes, elemNodes, attNodes, textNodes, and wsNodes, respectively.
    10. Use comments to document your JavaScript code throughout the program.
    11. Save your changes to the file, and then load nodes.htm in your Web browser. Verify that a node tree similar to that shown in Figure 14-67 is displayed alongside Jorge's article, and that the article contains 247 total nodes, 99 element nodes, 8 attribute nodes, and 140 text nodes, of which 56 are white space nodes. (Note: Safari running under iOS may report 57 white space nodes.)
    12. Submit your completed files to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.

    Learn More
  3. New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 14 Case 3 Sporting Abstract and Statistical Review

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 14 Case 3 Sporting Abstract and Statistical Review

    Regular Price: $25.00

    Special Price: $20.00

    New Perspectives on HTML, CSS, and Dynamic HTML 5th edition Tutorial 14 Case 3 Sporting Abstract and Statistical Review



    Data Files needed for this Case Problem: gradient.png, modernizr-1.5.js, nfltxt.htm, sasr.css, sasrlogo.png, stats.js, table.css, tabletxt.js

     

    Sporting Abstract and Statistical Review Walter Delacreaux is the owner and operator of Sporting Abstract and Statistical Review, a new blog and forum to report on and analyze data from the world of sports. Walter wants to fill his Web site with useful tables that other people who share his enthusiasm for statistics can review and study. He wants these tables to be as interactive as possible. One feature he wants to add to his tables is the ability to sort them in a different order by clicking a column heading. Figure 14-70 shows a preview of the Web page you'll create for Walter.
    Walter has stored statistics about quarterbacks, running backs, wide receivers, kick returners, and punt returners in a set of multidimensional arrays. He also has created design styles for the stats table that he wants to appear on his Web page. Your job will be to write the code that generates the node tree for the Web table, and to provide commands to sort the contents of that table when a user clicks one of the table heading cells. Walter wants the table to be sorted by default in descending order, but users should be able to change the sort direction by clicking the same column heading twice in succession. Walter also has provided buttons to allow users to switch from one category of player to another.
    Complete the following:
    1. Using your text editor, open the nfltxt.htm and tabletxt.js files from the tutorial.14\case3 folder. Enter your name and the date in the comment section of each file, and then save them as nflstats.htm and table.js, respectively.
    2. Take some time to view the contents of the nflstats.htm, table.js, and stats.js files, noting the structure of the HTML document and the global variables and functions in the two JavaScript files.
    3. Return to the nflstats.htm file in your text editor, and then add a link element to connect the file to the table.css style sheet file. Add script elements to connect to the stats.js file followed by the table.js file. Save your changes to the file.
    4. Go to the table.js JavaScript file. Below the comment section, declare the following global variables:
    a. caption, which is used to store the text of the table caption. Set its initial value to the value of the qbStatsCaption variable.
    b. head, which is used to store the array of column headings. Set its initial value to the value of the qbStatsHead variable.
    c. sortIndex, which is used to store the column index of the table column by which the stats table will be sorted. Set its initial value to the value of the qbStatsSort variable.
    d. stats, which is used to store the multidimensional array of player statistics. Set its initial value to the value of the qbStats variable.
    e. sortDown, which is used to indicate whether the table is sorted in descending or ascending order. Set its initial value to true.
    5. Add a command to run the makeStatsTable() function when the page is loaded by the browser.
    6. You’ll create the Web table with separate functions for each part of the table. The first function you’ll create is the createTableCaption() function, which is used to create the structure of the table caption. The function has two parameters, table and caption, which are used for the table element node and the caption text, respectively. Have the function create the element node <caption>caption</caption> where caption is the value of the caption parameter, and then append that element node to the table parameter.
    7. Create the createTableColumns() function. The purpose of this function is to create the structure of the colgroup element. The function has two parameters: table, which represents the table element, and cols, which is an integer containing the number of columns in the column group. Use a for loop to generate the node structure <colgroup> <col /> <col class=”sortColumn” /> <col /> … </colgroup>
    where the number of nested col elements is equal to the value of the cols parameter. Note that Walter wants the column by which the table is sorted to be given the class name sortColumn. Therefore, within your for loop, test each index number to determine whether it equals the sortIndex variable. If it does, add the class attribute to the col element. Append the node structure to the table parameter.
    8. Create the createTableHead() function. The purpose of this function is to write the table header. The function has two parameters: table for the table element and cols for the number of columns in the header. Use a for loop to create the node structure <thead> <tr> <th id=”1sortcolumn”>head[1]</th> <th id=”2sortcolumn”>head[2]</th> … </tr> </thead> where head[1], head[2], etc., are the values from the head array global variable you declared in Step 4. Append the node structure to the table parameter.
    9. Create the createTableFoot() function. The purpose of this function is to write the table footer. The function has two parameters, table and cols, and creates the node structure
    <tfoot> <tr> <th colspan=”cols”> Stats compiled by SASR &copy; 2015. All rights reserved. </th> </tr> </tfoot> where cols is the value of the cols variable. (Hint: You must use the colSpan property to reference the colspan attribute.) Append the node structure to the table parameter.
    10. Create the createTableBody() function. The purpose of this function is to write the rows and columns of the table body. The function has three parameters: table representing the Web table, rows, which contains the integer value of the number of rows in the table body, and cols, which contains the integer value of the number of cells within each table row. Use a nested for loop to generate the node structure <tbody> <tr> <td class=”textCell”>stats[0][0]</td> <td class=”numCell”>stats[0][1]</td> … </tr> <tr> <td class=”numCell”>stats[1][0]</td> … </tr> … </tbody>
    where stats[0][0], stats[0][1], etc., are the values from the stats multidimensional array you declared in Step 4. Note that for each td element, you add a class attribute with the value textCell or numCell based on whether the value displayed in the cell is a number or a text string. Use the isNumeric() function provided in the table.js file to make this determination. Append the node structure to the table parameter.
    11. Create the makeStatsTable() function. The purpose of this function is to sort the statistical values, put the different parts of the table together, and append the table to the Web document. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Declare a variable named rows equal to the length of the stats array.
    b. Declare a variable named cols equal to the length of the head array.
    c. Use the JavaScript sort method along with the colSort() function to sort the contents of the stats array.
    d. Create a table element named tableElem with the id statsTable.
    e. Call the createTableCaption(), createTableColumns(), createTableHead(), createTableFoot(), and createTableBody() functions using tableElem as the parameter value for the table parameter and caption, rows, and cols as the values for the caption, rows, and cols parameters, respectively, to construct the entire node structure of the Web table.
    f. Declare the statsBox variable, referencing the element in the Web document with the id statsBox.
    g. Replace the first child node of statsBox with the tableElem element node.
    12. Save your changes to the file, and then load nflstats.htm in your Web browser. Verify that the content of the Quarterbacks table is displayed on the page.
    13. Next, you’ll enable users to sort the table by different columns. Return to the table.js file in your text editor. Go to the createTableHead() function. For each th element node generated in your for loop, add an onclick event handler to run the changeDirection() function when clicked.
    14. Create the changeDirection() function. The purpose of this function is to either
    change the sorting direction of the currently selected column, or sort the table by a
    newly selected column. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Use the parseInt() function to extract the index number from the currently selected column. (Hint: Use the this keyword.)
    b. If the index number is equal to the value of the sortIndex global variable you created in Step 4 (indicating that the user has clicked the current sort column), use the negation operator to change the Boolean value of the global sortDown variable from false to true or from true to false. Otherwise, change the value of the sortIndex variable to the index number of the currently selected column.
    c. Call the makeStatsTable() function to regenerate the statistics table.
    15. Save your changes to the file, and then reload nflstats.htm in your Web browser. Verify that you can change the sorting column by clicking each column heading, and that you can toggle the sorting direction by clicking each column heading in succession.
    16. Next, you’ll enable users to select different statistics tables to view in the Web page. Return to the table.js file in your text editor. Create the changeTable() function with a single parameter: statsCategory. The statsCategory parameter will contain a text string indicating the statistics table to view. Add the following commands to the function:
    a. Use the eval() function to change the values of the global variables caption, head, sortIndex, and stats to the value of the statsCategoryCaption, statsCategoryHead, statsCategorySort, and statsCategory variables, respectively, where statsCategory is the value of the statsCategory parameter.
    b. Change the value of the sortDown global variable to true.
    c. Call the makeStatsTable() function to regenerate the statistics table.
    17. Add informative comments to the code in your file and then close the file, saving your changes.
    18. Return to the nflstats.htm file in your text editor. Locate the input elements for the five table buttons, and then add an onclick attribute to each input button to run the command changeTable(stats) where stats is either qbStats, rbStats, wrStats, krStats, or prStats depending on whether the Quarterbacks, Running Backs, Wide Receivers, Kick Returners, or Punt Returners button is clicked.
    19. Save your changes to the file, and then reload nflstats.htm in your Web browser. Verify that you can load different statistics tables by clicking the five statistical category buttons.
    20. Submit your completed files to your instructor, in either printed or electronic form, as requested.
    Learn More
  4. IST 222 Final Project fictitious Rock Band Schedule Page

    IST 222 Final Project Fictitious Rock Band Website

    Regular Price: $30.00

    Special Price: $25.00

    IST 222 Final Project


    Create a website for a fictitious Rock Band.


    All information for the band can be made up. I encourage you to be creative and have fun with the assignment.
    Place all files in a folder in your account entitled 'Final'.


    Required:
    The main page should be index.html. When I load that page, it should tell me the site has been redesigned and redirect me to the new page.


    The new page should be named new.html. This page should have links to the following support pages: schedule, Bios, Feedback. In addition to these links, the page should contain a welcome message and general info about the band. The link on the page should feature a mouse over effect, and when I point to each link, I should see a brief description of where that link takes me in a popup text area.


    The schedule page (sched.html) should have a nicely formatted table showing me at least 6 upcoming concerts. It should show me the city date and location for each concert. The table should be centered on the page. All locations should be in South Carolina. At the bottom of the page, place a simple map of the South Carolina with a star over each concert location. When I click on that star (or general area), I should go to support page telling me about that location. (name these pages loca1, loc2, loc3, etc - these pages need not contain much info, just enough text to show me the page is there.)


    The bio page (bio.html) should have a picture of each member of the band (at least 4) and a brief bio of each member. The pictures should all be the same size and should float to the left or right side of the page alternatively.


    The feedback page (feed.html) should include a form asking for the fan's name, email address, gender, age, and state. It should include a text box for the fan to provide feedback and the necessary form buttons.

    Learn More
  5. Penn foster Graded Project 40206200 HTML Coding Home Page

    Penn foster Graded Project 40206200 HTML Coding

    Regular Price: $30.00

    Special Price: $25.00

    Penn foster Graded Project 40206200 HTML Coding


    OVERVIEW
    After completing the exercises and the examination for your HTML Coding study guide, you're now ready to complete the graded project. For the graded project, you'll use HTML and JavaScript to create a new Web page by using many of the new Web designing skills you've learned. You'll then upload the project to the student Web hosting site.


    INSTRUCTIONS
    For the graded project, you'll create a Web page from scratch using many of the HTML commands you've learned. Follow each step and add each of the presentation elements as instructed.
    Laura Cameron, owner of Cameron Cookies in Portland, Maine, asks you to create a Web page for her. She wants her customers to be able to view her contact information, a listing of some types of cookies she sells, and an e-mail link to contact her at the store. She also wants you to link this page to a Web form where customers can order cookies. Follow the instructions below to create these Web pages for Laura.
    1. Open a text editor, such as Windows Notepad.
    2. Type the following lines of code into your document as shown below (Figure 1):
    <HTML>
    <HEAD>
    <TITLE> Cameron Cookies </TITLE>
    </HEAD>
    <BODY>
    </BODY>
    </HTML>
    3. Add a welcome message to your Web page by typing Heading 1 tags under the <BODY> tag as follows:
    <H1> Cameron Cookies </H1>
    4. Save the file as "index.htm."
    5. Open a Web browser to view how your Web page looks. From the File menu, click Open and locate where you saved the file index.htm before clicking OK. Your Web page should look like Figure 2.
    6. Change the color and positioning of your heading by
    - Aligning the heading in the center
    - Changing the font color to red
    - Changing the font face to Arial. If Arial isn't available, then use Helvetica. If Helvetica isn't available, then use Sans Serif.
    7. Save your changes and return to your Web browser. Press F5 to refresh the page to view your changes on your Web page (Figure 3).
    8. Underneath the heading, add the following text: "The best homemade cookies in New England." Be sure to format this text as
    - Heading 2
    - Italicized (if Heading 2 isn’t already italicized)
    - Centered
    9. Save your changes and return to your Web browser. Press F5 to refresh the page to view your changes in your Web page (Figure 4).
    10. Underneath this heading, add the following address information as paragraph text: 99 Sycamore St. Portland, ME 04101 (207) 555-1212 Be sure to center the text.
    11. Add the following text underneath the address. Welcome to Cameron Cookies, which has been voted "the best homemade cookies in New England" in a recent poll. At Cameron Cookies, you're sure to find a cookie you’ll love. Here's a sampling of our many varieties:
    Chocolate Nut
    Macadamia Nut
    Oatmeal Raisin
    M & M's
    White Chocolate
    Chocolate Pecan
    Chocolate Hazelnut
    Cookies are a great gift idea that everybody loves. Just give us a call or send us an e-mail 24 hours in advance and we'll create a lovely gift bag or basket filled with an assortment of fresh, homemade cookies. Thanks for visiting our Web site and be sure to come visit us in person here in Portland, Maine. To place an order, click here.
    12. Take your own photos or search through the Web to find photos of cookies to illustrate your Web pages. Create a table to display photos of each type of cookie to the left of the cookie name as in Figure 6. (Make sure your images don't have copyright restrictions. One source of free clip art is http://dgl.microsoft.com/.) Right-click the image and save it to the same folder where your Web page is located. Insert the photos in your HTML document to the left of each cookie name. Note: You may have to create a table for your images to appear correctly.
    13. Find an image to use as your background of your Web page. Change your background to include this background image.
    14. Save your changes in your text file and refresh your Web page in your browser.
    15. Go back to the text you just entered in your HTML document and find the words "click here." Create a link from the words "click here" to a new Web page that
    you haven't created yet called "orderform.htm," which you’ll save to the same folder as Cameron Cookies.
    16. Save your changes in your text file and refresh your Web page in your browser. The words "click here" should now appear as a hyperlink, similar to Figure 5. (Don't click on the hyperlink; it's not yet fully functional.)
    17. Save your file and check your e-mail link. Your Web page should look similar to Figure 6.


    Adding Links
    Now you’re going to add more links to your home page for Cameron Cookies.
    1. If you closed your HTML document for index.htm, reopen it now.
    2. Under the address line for Cameron Cookies, insert a table with the following elements:
    - Table width = 500
    - One row
    - Four columns
    - No border
    - Table row data is centered
    3. Within each table cell, type the following text:
    - About Us
    - Contact Us
    - Place an Order
    - Sample Recipe
    4. You're going to add a link for the text you just added.
    Follow the directions below for the destination of each link:
    - Link "About Us" to the page "about.htm." You haven't created this page yet, so the link won't be active until you create the About Us page. However, create the link to this page now.
    - Link "Contact Us" to the e-mail address cookiemaster@cameroncookies.com.
    - Link "Place an Order" to the page "orderform.htm."
    You haven't created this page yet, so it won't be active until you create the Order Form page.
    - Link "Sample Recipe" to the page "recipe.htm." You haven't created this page yet so it won’t be active until you create the recipe page.
    5. Save your changes and check your Web file in a browser.
    Your Web page should look similar to Figure 7. You're now finished with the index.htm page.


    Creating Your Other Pages
    1. Copy your index.htm page and save it as "about.htm." You’re going to use some elements of the main page in all your other pages, so you don’t have to retype them.
    2. Scroll down your HTML code to find the text "Welcome to Cameron Cookies." Now delete all the text from "Welcome" to the end of the page.
    3. Make a copy of your about.htm file and save it as "recipe.htm."
    4. Make another copy and save it as "orderform.htm."
    5. Open the Web page for each new page created in your browser. Your Web pages should have your image, headers, address, and links; however, the remaining text should be gone.


    Modifying the About Us Page
    1. Type the following text and format it to look like the text in Figure 8.
    Cameron Cookies was created by Bill and Laura Cameron in 1995. The Camerons began selling homemade cookies around their neighborhood using a family recipe passed down by Bill’s grandmother, Stella Cameron. Their cookies were so popular that Bill and Laura had to expand their business, and in 1996 they moved to their current location in Portland, Maine. Cameron Cookies continues to sell off the shelves. Visitors to Maine drive out of their way to sample these wonderful, rich cookies that they’ve heard so much about. We hope to see you soon! Bill and Laura
    2. Change your link "About Us" to "Home."
    3. Change the destination of the link "Home" to index.htm.
    4. Save your changes to your file and open the Web page for about.htm in your browser. Your page should look similar to Figure 8.
    5. Test that the link for “Home” functions correctly. You'll be creating the recipe page next.


    Modifying the Recipe Page
    1. Type Chocolate Chip Cookies in a Heading 2 format.
    2. Type Ingredients in a Heading 3 format.
    3. Type the following list of ingredients in an unordered list:
    1/2 cup butter, softened
    1 cup light brown sugar
    3 tablespoons sugar
    1 large egg
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    1-3/4 cups flour
    12 HTML Coding
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1-1/2 cups chocolate chips
    4. Type Directions in a Heading 3 format.
    5. Type the following in an ordered list format:
    1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Cream butter with sugars.
    2. Beat in egg and vanilla extract.
    3. Mix dry ingredients in bowl. Add slowly to butter mixture. Stir in chocolate chips.
    4. Drop cookie dough using a spoon onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake for 20 minutes or until browned.
    Type the following:
    Yield: 2 dozen cookies
    7. Save your Web page and view it in a browser. It should appear similar to Figure 9.


    Modifying the Web Order Form
    1. Add the form tags to your HTML document.
    After your links, create a table for your order form with the following elements:
    - Width = 65%
    - Border = 0
    - Cellpadding = 2
    2. Within this table, you're going to create nested tables for your order form. The first table will contain personal information, the second will contain order information, and the third will contain payment information.
    3. Create your first nested table and add form content and data to your table as shown in Figure 10.
    4. Create your second nested table and add form content and data to your table as shown in Figure 11A and Figure 11B.
    5. Add the words, "$5.95 for 1–5 boxes, $10 for five or more boxes to the second column.
    6. Create your third nested table and add form content and data to your table as shown in Figure 12.
    7. Save your file and refresh the Web page in your browser.
    8. Check that all links on all pages are functional.


    Working with Dynamic Content and JavaScript
    This third part of your graded project involves working with dynamic content. You’re going to create transient status bar messages and a pop-up window. Turn to page 741 of your textbook and follow the directions for Case Problem 1.

    Learn More
  6. Penn Foster Graded Project 40266900 Additional Case 2

    Penn Foster Graded Project 40266900 Additional Case 2 Tutorial 9 Review and Tutorial 10 Review

    Regular Price: $25.00

    Special Price: $20.00

    Penn Foster Graded Project 40266900 Additional Case 2 Tutorial 9 Review and Tutorial 10 Review


    Lesson 3 Creating Forms and CSS JavaScript and XHTML


    New Perspectives on HTML, XHTML, and Dynamic HTML
    Additional Case 2
    Tutorial 9 Review
    Tutorial 10 Review


    In this graded project, you’re going to work on three separate projects, all on concepts you learned in this lesson. First, you’ll create a Web site for Mayer Photography, including style sheets, images, tables, embedded video, and links. Then, you’ll create an XHTML file that you’ll test in an XHTML validator like you did earlier in this lesson. Finally, you’ll add JavaScript to a Web page using a date function.


    Part 1
    Turn to page HTML ADD 11 and locate “Additional Case 2:
    Designing a Style for a Web Site.” Follow the directions to create the pages for this site. Be sure you test your pages and compare them to the images in your book.
    Hint: To save time, you can copy the content and formatting from the mayer.htm file to the other files, then update the content in the new files as directed in your text book.


    Part 2
    Turn to page 513 and locate the Review Assignments section at the bottom of the page. Follow the steps in this assignment to validate a document in XHTML 1.0 strict DTD.
    Hint: Use the validator you used in Assignment 9 to test your files Use the validator you used in Assignment 9 to test your files.


    Part 3
    Turn to page 565 and locate the Review Assignments section. Follow the steps here to create a custom function showing the date from a date object.

    Learn More

6 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction